Online music magazine based in Copenhagen, Denmark

Monthly archive

December 2013

Video: MØ performing XXX 88 live

in Blog/New Music by

Copenhagen, sold out and taken by storm. MØ’s concert at Store Vega (read our review here) was something to remember – and luckily for those who was not there, it was also filmed. Watch the first of the four videos below.

Sessions of the year 2013

in Sessions by

 

The Luyas

Watch the entire session HERE

Reptile Youth

Watch the entire session HERE

Cody

Watch the entire session HERE

Shiny Darkly

Watch the entire session HERE

Schultz and Forever

Watch the entire session HERE

Jacob Bellens

Watch the entire session HERE

Egyptian Hip Hop

Adam Green and Binki Shapiro

Watch the entire session HERE

Shout Out Louds

Watch the entire session HERE

Widowspeak

Watch the entire session HERE

Ice Cream Cathedral

Watch the entire session HERE

The Woken Trees

Watch the entire session HERE

Broke

Watch the entire session HERE

Ghost Venue

Watch the entire session HERE

Ásgeir

Watch the entire session HERE

Kool A.D.

Watch the entire session HERE

Taragana Pyjarama

Watch the entire session HERE

The Felines

Watch the entire session HERE

ARTICLE: Shiny Darkly – Going underground….

in Blog by

Photos by Tom Spray

Hiding underground in a hill-covered bunker is a place where haunting vocals, noisy guitar riffs, hypnotic bass lines and pounding drums live and breathe alongside sinister songs with titles like “He’s Suicidal”, “Dead Stars” and “Bury Us”.

The bunker serves as rehearsal space for the young post-punk trio Shiny Darkly that came into the consciousness of the Danish music aficionados with their self-titled debut-EP in the spring of 2012.

Shiny Darkly (Photo by Tom Spray)

Since then Kristoffer Bech (vocals/guitars), Oliver Matthew Voltz (bass) and Mads Lassen (drums) have kept the well deserved hype-kettle boiling with a string of high-profile gigs at SPOT Festival, Roskilde Festival, Iceland Airwaves and South by Southwest.

These concerts have both made Shiny Darkly a tight musical unit and also served as a solid ground to continually develop their sound that graces the debut album Little Earth which will hit the record shelves in spring 2014.

”We’ve been really aware in the writing process that we wouldn’t want to repeat ourselves”, the trio firmly proclaims as we catch up with them in the rehearsal space underground.

Shiny Darkly (Photo by Tom Spray)

This development is evident in the lead track on the band’s new EP, which serves as a teaser for the album.

Ticking in on 9:35, “Dead Stars” sees Shiny Darkly aiming towards a more epic scope, while still keeping the boys’ sinister dark and twisted soundscapes intact. Actually Kristoffer Bech’s vocals are more desperate than ever as he wails like the apocalypse is at hand during the song’s different crescendos, alongside an army of cacophonic trumpets buried in the layered sound.

The decision in giving the song that long a progression arose during an evening in the studio where the band was just playing the song for fun:

”’Dead Stars’ has been developed throughout live concerts since the band’s inception and has therefore always been part of our history. We didn’t really intend on recording it, but one evening in the studio, we just played it in a sort of freestyle jam and that actually ended up being the final track. It was basically just done in a one-take.  Somehow it seemed like something new and refreshing to us in contrast to the short punky stuff, we’ve already made. And also to give people a teaser of what’s to come.”

Shiny Darkly (Photo by Tom Spray)

The recording sessions for the debut album Little Earth was also quite different from the process of making the EP and shows the band’s progression and their vision for a more broader sound. Whereas the EP was recorded and mixed in a week with Jens ‘Benz’ Søndergaard at the controls, Shiny Darkly wanted to have more time at their hands to experiment and explore new stuff for the album. They found the perfect ally in Crunchy Frog label boss Jesper ‘Yebo’ Reginal who serves as producer on the album. Having him on board played a big part in the atmosphere of the recording process:

”Working with Yebo was a blast! He has an incredible amount of energy which oozed into us, and a sheer, almost childish joy when he works in the studio. That was really great for the atmosphere of the recording. Also during the moments where things weren’t running smoothly, he was good at boosting our confidence and getting the spirits back on track. Yebo was also an asset in regards to the final adjustments of the song arrangements. In some of the songs he could see that they would benefit from longer instrumental parts, nurturing the groove we had going in a particular song and letting the instruments breathe.”

Shiny Darkly (Photo by Tom Spray)

Little Earth was recorded in the esteemed studios Gula and Tambourine in Malmö, known for their warm analogue sound and arsenal of vintage equipment. Elements that also made their way onto the album, where xylophones, synths, vibraphones, congas and brass instruments fuse with Shiny Darkly’s signature post-punk frenzy of guitars, bass and drums.

The decision to record in Sweden was a deliberate choice for the band after spending intense periods in the rehearsal space for six months leading up to the recordings, they needed to get away and to create the album in an environment where they ”lived with the recording sessions” and thus prevent the breaks of concentration if they went home every night. This outing proved to be efficient for Shiny Darkly as they travelled ‘hinsidan’ just after the summer holiday. The recordings were done after only six days, four spent in Gula (recording the basic tracks) and two spent in Tambourine (overdubbing). The process was very intense at times, sometimes working 20 hours a day. But with Yebo’s good spirits raising the mood when things went awry, the trio came through and they’re very satisfied with the result:

”It has been important for us to achieve a sonic expression that hopefully shows our development. The sound of the EP is pretty lo-fi with a compact and somehow narrow scope, whereas the album has a broader sound where the details in our music are really allowed to shine through. That’s also the reason why we made the album in a high-end studio, because we wanted to give our sound and expression the best conditions. We had a pretty strong vision in regards to a really high-end well-produced drum sound against a dirty and distorted wall of guitars and vocals. The best of both worlds: something dark and beautiful in a great blend.”

Shiny Darkly (Photo by Tom Spray)

The current Dead Stars EP was also mixed abroad, in a studio in Berlin, but Shiny Darkly felt they needed to have more hands-on focus during that vital phase, so the album itself is being mixed by Jens Søndergaard, so somehow the circle has been completed. Shiny Darkly’s forthcoming soundscapes ending up in the hands of the man who first brought the band’s music to life.

And the boys are pretty much on top of things as to how the mixing will turn out and are eagerly waiting to share ‘their baby’ with the rest of us:

”The fact that Jens is mixing the album gives us a good feeling, ’cause he knows our expression and has an idea on how we want the songs to sound. And right now the collective band spirit is really high, in terms of the album turning out exactly how we wanted it. There are several moments where the dream scenario has been achieved and other moments where the music has been brought down new and exciting paths.”

Shiny Darkly (Photo by Tom Spray)

These confident words are the closing remarks from the young men and as we’re getting ready to leave the bunker, Kristoffer, Oliver and Mads grab for their instruments for an impromptu rehearsal.

After the final notes ring out, they smile at each other: ”Wow, that sounded great. It’s awesome rehearsing again. Let’s do another one.”

And this is how we leave the band, fully submerged in the thing that they do so convincingly: making dark and appealing music and loving it.

Little Earth is out on Crunchy Frog in the spring of 2014 and will see an immediate release in Scandinavia, GSA, Benelux, UK and Canada.

VIEW OUR SESSION WITH SHINY DARKLY HERE

Get Your Gun reveal debut album details

in Blog/New Music by

Get Your Gun have shared a teaser video with snippets from their debut album The Worrying Kind which is set for release in April 2014 (TBC), with the first single from the album scheduled for February 2014. The video was directed by Here Today contributor Jonas Bang while on tour with the band in Russia and Estonia this fall. View photos from said tour HERE

Photos of the year 2013

in Blog/Photos by

The Hives

The Hives, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 31.01.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The_Men-9

The Men, Stengade, Copenhagen, 21.03.2013 (Photo by Morten Krogh)

The Soft Moon, Loppen, Copenhagen, 30.03.2013 (Photo by Morten Krogh)

Shout Out Louds, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 09.04.2013 (Photo by Hilmar Darri Flygenring)

Folkeklubben-3581

Folkeklubben, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 25.04.2013 (Photo by Morten Krogh)

Autre Ne Veut

Autre Ne Veut, Rust, Copenhagen, 23.04.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Daughter

Daughter, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 10.04.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids

Japandroids, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 03.04.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Jake Bugg

Jake Bugg, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 02.04.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Palma Violets

Palma Violets, BETA, Copenhagen, 31.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Schultz and Forever

Schultz and Forever, DR Byen, Copenhagen, 03.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Araab Muzik

Araab Muzik, KB3, Copenhagen, 08.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metz

Metz, Ideal Bar, Copenhagen, 04.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Crystal Castles

Crystal Castles, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 02.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Cody

Cody, Store Vega, 01.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Widowspeak

Widowspeak, Loppen, Copenhagen, 08.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 10.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

The Eclectic Moniker, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 10.05.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Øresundsfestival 2013

Broke, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 11.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

MØ, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 11.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

Iceage, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 11.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

The White Album, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 11.05.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen, Parken, Copenhagen, 14.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Bring Me The Horizon

Bring Me The Horizon, Amager Bio, Copenhagen, 18.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Beach Fossils

Beach Fossils, Stengade, Copenhagen, 21.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Nick Cave

Nick Cave, Optimus Primavera Sound, Porto, 31.05.2013 (Photo by Janye Yong)

blur

Blur, Optimus Primavera Sound, Porto, 31.05.2013 (Photo by Janye Yong)

grizzly bear

Grizzly Bear, Optimus Primavera Sound, Porto, 01.06.2013 (Photo by Janye Yong)

A$AP Rocky (Photo by Tom Spray)

A$AP Rocky, Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, 11.06.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Mew (Photo by Tom Spray)

Mew, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 12.06.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The National (Photo by Tom Spray)

The National, Loppen, Copenhagen, 20.06.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Trash Talk (Photo by Tom Spray)

Trash Talk, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 27.06.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Drenge (Photo by Tom Spray)

Drenge, Roskilde Festival, 04.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Savages (Photo by Tom Spray)

Savages, Roskilde Festival, 04.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Slipknot (Photo by Tom Spray)

Slipknot crowd, Roskilde Festival, 04.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Animal Collective (Photo by Tom Spray)

Animal Collective, Roskilde Festival, 04.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metz (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metz, Roskilde Festival, 05.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

EL-P (Photo by Tom Spray)

EL-P, Roskilde Festival, 05.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Iceage (Photo by Tom Spray)

Iceage, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013

Action Bronson (Photo by Tom Spray)

Action Bronson, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The National (Photo by Tom Spray)

The National, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metallica (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metallica, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Sigur Ros (Photo by Tom Spray)

Sigur Ros, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

James Blake (Photo by Tom Spray)

James Blake, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (Photo by Tom Spray)

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Queens Of The Stone Age (Photo by Tom Spray)

Queens Of The Stone Age, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kraftwerk (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kraftwerk, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kraftwerk (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kraftwerk crowd, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

John Legend (Photo by Tom Spray)

John Legend, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 16.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Sleep Party People (Photo by Tom Spray)

Sleep Party People, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 27.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Smashing Pumpkins Photos by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

The Smashing Pumpkins, Falconer Salen, 31.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

OFF Festival

OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

AlunaGeorge, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

AlunaGeorge, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Cloud Nothing, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Cloud Nothings, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Scenes, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Julia Holter, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Julia Holter, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Walkmen, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Walkmen, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Autre Ne Veut, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Autre Ne Veut, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids crowd, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

We draw A, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

We draw A, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Fucked Up, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Fucked Up, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

My Bloody Valentine, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

My Bloody Valentine, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Godspeed You! Black Emperor Photos by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Tivoli Concert Hall, Copenhagen, 07.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

ice_cream_cathedral-8479

Ice Cream Cathedral, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 07.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Haim

Haim, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 07.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Tame Impala - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Tame Impala, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 09.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Dirty Beaches - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Dirty Beaches, Copenhagen, 11.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Mikal Cronin - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Mikal Cronin, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 11.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Ducktails - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Ducktails, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 11.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

transmetro-9211

Trans Metro Express, Strøm Festival, 13.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

haxan cloak

The Haxan Cloak, Cisternerne, Copenhagen, 14.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

malmo-festival-9366

Ice Cream Cathedral, Malmo Festival, Road Trip, 17.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

malmo-9862

Baby In Vain, Malmo Festival, Road Trip, 17.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

byrne-vincent-9963

David Byrne & St Vincent, Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, 22.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

MS MR Live 1

MS MR, Rust, Copenhagen, 28.08.2013 (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Matthew E. White (Photo by Jen Tse)

Matthew E. White, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 09.09.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

APlaceToBuryStrangers-2063

A Place To Bury Strangers, Loppen, Copenhagen, 24.09.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Delorean (Photo by Jen Tse)

Delorean, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 25.09.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

Editors (Photo by Tom Spray)

Editors, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 26.09.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

MGMT (Photo by Jen Tse)

MGMT, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 01.10.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

James Blake (Photo by James Hjertholm)

James Blake crowd, Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, 06.10.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Baby In Vain (Photo by Jen Tse)

Baby In Vain, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 04.10.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

Washed Out - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Washed Out, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 09.10.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Foals (Photo by Tom Spray)

Foals, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 15.10.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Julianna Barwick (Photo by Tom Spray)

Julianna Barwick, Jazzhouse, Copenhagen, 20.10.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Biffy Clyro by Jen Tse

Biffy Clyro, Den Grå Hal, Copenhagen, 01.11.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

national 1

The National, Forum, Copenhagen, 02.11.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

JuliaHolter-5362

Julia Holter, Jazzhouse, Copenhagen, 05.11.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

IMG_6180small

Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, 08.11.2013 (Photo by Jonas Bang)

14. okt 13 80_o

The Woken Trees, UK tour (Photo by Jonas Bang)

Crystal Stilts-7055

Crystal Stilts, Stengade, Copenhagen, 14.11.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

fuckbuttonsmulti

Fuck Buttons, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 16.11.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Volcano Choir (Photo by Tom Spray)

Volcano Choir, Amager Bio, Copenhagen, 18.11.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Youth Lagoon (Photo by Jen Tse)

Youth Lagoon, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 20.11.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

EL-P and Killer Mike (Photo by Tom Spray)

EL-P and Killer Mike, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 20.11.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Tallest Man On Earth (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Tallest Man On Earth, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 21.11.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Get Your Gun (Photo by Jonas Bang)

Get Your Gun, Russia/Estonia tour, fall 2013 (Photo by Jonas Bang)

Trentemøller (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Trentemøller, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 22.11.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

blouse-8593

Blouse, Loppen, Copenhagen, 26.11.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

MØ (Photo by James Hjertholm)

MØ, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 28.11.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Queens Of The Stone Age (Photo Jen Tse)

Queens Of The Stone Age, Forum, Copenhagen, 29.11.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

Destroyer (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Destroyer, Jazzhouse, Copenhagen, 03.12.2013 (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Kurt Vile (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Kurt Vile, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 05.12.2013 (Photo by Ivan Boll)

20131213-182524.jpg

Oh Land, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 12.12.2013 (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Cut Copy (Photo by Tom Spray)

Cut Copy, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 13.12.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

VIDEO EXCLUSIVE: The Rumour Said Fire – “Moon Stream”

in Blog/New Music by

The Rumour Said Fire have exclusively shared the video for their new single “Moon Stream” from 2012’s second album Dead Ends. Speaking about the track and video process the bands frontman Jesper Lidang had this to say:

“This song has gone through so many transformations during the period of writing it and has turned out this dark pop song about both deep love and the despair that follows when you feel unfulfilled. Shooting the video took place at the Danish venue Stengade where I had good times smashing stuff with directors Sara Laub and Kamilla Bruus. We wanted to catch the feeling of solitude in the song and therefore its only me from the band dancing in the dark – it’s just me and a beautiful fire dancer. It was fun.” 

Watch the video for “Moon Stream” below:

INTERVIEW: Cut Copy

in Blog by

The dreariness of a Copenhagen winter is easily combatted by the shiny electronica of Australia’s Cut Copy. Their fourth full length album, Free Your Mind, sees the quartet expanding on the synth pop of its predecessor, Zonoscope, while exploring more experimental territory.

“Probably everything we do is pop to some degree,” says frontman Dan Whitford. “Even when we think we’re doing something crazy, it still sounds a bit poppy.”

Whitfrod sat down with us backstage at Lille Vega ahead of the final show of Cut Copy’s tour to talk about Free Your Mind, touring, recording, and why he’s afraid of concept albums.

Cut Copy (Photo by Tom Spray)

Today’s the last day of the tour?

Last show. We fly back tomorrow. I think we’ve got most of the day here, and then we fly out in the evening. It’s crazy. The start of this tour just seemed like a never-ending run of shows. We have a backstage pass with all the shows on it, and we completed a whole US tour and it wasn’t even a quarter of the way through! We were like, “What the hell is going on? It’s going to go forever.” But we somehow got there. It’s been a really fun tour, actually, so that certainly hasn’t been a problem. But I think just being away from home, and missing being in Australian summer for two months is a bit of a thing for us. We’re keen to get back and put some shorts on and go to the beach.

Had the new songs been road tested before?

No, this was our first tour for the record. It came out when we’d already started this tour, so this was the first chance to play these songs to our fans. But it’s been cool.

Is there a learning curve to playing them live?

Yeah, we do figure it out but until you actually go on stage sometimes you don’t actually know what’s going to work properly or whether the songs come across properly to crowds. I guess just because the way we write music is very much that when we’re in a studio, we’re not thinking about performing live, we’re just like, “well, we can add this and add this and all sorts of crazy shit.” But then when it actually gets to playing it, we can’t have 30 different instruments on stage. We each play our parts, so sometimes it’s a weird translation from the record to a live context. I think you have to adapt a bit as you go. But thankfully the songs from this record seem to have worked really well from the beginning. I haven’t felt like we’ve had to change much, it’s just been like, “Yes, that’s how it should sound.”

Cut Copy (Photo by Tom Spray)

Any songs in particular working well?

I really enjoy playing, “Let Me Show You Love.” I guess it’s a more deep song, maybe not quite as much of a pop song as some of the other tracks on the record. It seemed like maybe that was something that wouldn’t necessarily win over crowds. I mean, it was fun for us to play, but it’s actually worked really well in the context of the live set, and people really seem to get into it, so it’s a nice surprise that people are enjoying the track that we actually enjoy playing the most.

Do you prefer recording or touring?

It goes in phases. Certainly, by the end of making this record, I just wanted to go and play some shows. We’d been at home for a year and a half, we’d been working on the record writing, and then all these stages of recording, and then mixing. I think after a while you can’t even get in front of an audience, because you almost forget when you’re in a studio for too long that people are going to actually hear it. Because you think, after a while, it’s only the people in the band that have been listening to it, and that’s all that matters. But in actual fact, you just need other people to hear it. Sometimes you’re like, “What were we worrying about? It works!”

We’re still really enjoying playing live at the moment, but usually by the end of touring a particular record you’re pretty keen to get back in the studio, because I think as exciting as touring and traveling is, eventually you get to a point where you want to get some sort of creative stimulation again. You’ve been playing those songs so many times over and over that you want to find something new. It goes in cycles. It balances out. You can’t have one without the other, and they’re equally fun in their own way.

Do you ever write on the road?

It’s sort of difficult, because making electronic music in particular, it’s so reliant on the instruments and different synthesizers and equipment that you have on hand, you’re experimenting with all these different things, and using so many different things at once, that it’s kind of hard when you’re away touring. You don’t have access to all that. I’ve done remixing and that sort of thing while touring in the past, but not so much writing songs from scratch. I think probably also because half the time you’re on tour you’re feeling a bit hung over and sorry for yourself, so it’s not really the right mindset for being creative.

Cut Copy (Photo by Tom Spray)

Would you describe “Free Your Mind” as a theme for the album?

I guess it does. I think it emerged, but we didn’t set out to do that. We really set out to not think about the end result. When we were making the record, as almost a technique to not get stuck, we decided that we’re just going to be totally positive about any suggestion that anyone made. We’d just try it, no matter how stupid it sounded, and then we can always come back later, and we can decide then if it’s good or not. To avoid having a stalemate where you’re just not sure whether you should do something or not and then have an argument, let’s just do it. You can always decide later. We didn’t really go back and listen to any of the songs that we were writing or recording until much later, particularly as a group. It wasn’t until maybe six months or more into the process that we actually listened to all of the ideas that we’d been working on. That’s when we discovered that there might be some sort of thread that runs through some of these songs. Once we discovered that, we tried to draw that out a little bit. I guess maybe the concept emerged, but I’m always scared to say “concept album” because it sounds self indulgent.

Are there other lyrical themes?

I guess so. Not all the songs seem to fit into that same box. The thing that sets this record apart to me is that previous records have been a lot more personal or introverted. The first record feels like a weird, lonely, solitary record. This one feels like almost an open invitation to anyone and everyone to be involved in what the record is about. Almost like a call to arms in a way for people who are listening to it to let go and enjoy themselves and do whatever they need to do for that to happen. For me, it feels like that probably is the thing that sets it apart from other records that we’ve done.

Where did the dialogue samples come from?

All sorts of different places. Some of them are from old mini disc recordings that I made when I was a teenager, recording all these different things from television and radio and weird places. A large number of them are from field recordings. Ben, our bass player, moved to Washington DC, and went around with this portable recorder, and just recorded people. Just asking them about their weirdest experiences and the strangest things that had happened to them and got some pretty funny results. A lot of those have ended up on the record as well.

Cut Copy (Photo by Tom Spray)

What is your recording process like? As the main producer for the album, is it difficult to balance producing with recording?

At some point there needs to be someone that makes the final decision. I think we try to keep it as a group process up to a certain point. If no one can decide, I’m just like, “Well, I’m the producer, this is what we’re doing.” I put my foot down every now and then. But I think, inevitably, if you’re making electronic music you’re always producing your own music on some level. Even if you have an outside producer — like our second record, we worked with Tim Goldsworthy as a producer — but still, even just making the synthesizer sounds or deciding to use particular instruments, that’s basically doing the job of a producer. It’s not like we’re a rock band, we each have our instrument and that’s what happens. We switch around so much that it feels like we’re always producing our own records, even if we’re working with someone else. But it’s been cool, the last two records we’ve done in a very DIY way, where just found a cool space and set up our own studio, brought in all our own gear. It feels like a modern way of doing things as well, because you don’t need a big recording studio these days to make a record. You can bring in your computer and some good equipment and all your instruments, and there’s no reason you can’t make an awesome-sounding record.

Have you set up a permanent studio?

No, we’ve had two different ones. They were both warehouses. The first one, the one we used for Zonoscope, was a very rustic: Holes in the ceiling, no heating or anything like that. It was incredibly cold, because we were recording in winter, so we had these big coats on, and had one little bar heater that we huddled around, and if someone had to go and record something, they’d have to run up to the other end of the room, get cold as they were recording their instruments, and run back again. This time around we found a much better space that had actual acoustic treatment because bands were rehearsing there sometimes. And it had heating. We learned from the Zonoscope experience that some comfort is probably good.

Cut Copy (Photo by Tom Spray)

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Oh Land / Store Vega, Copenhagen, 12.12.2013

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LIVE REVIEW: Oh Land, Store Vega, 12.12.2013

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The second of Oh Land’s two homecoming shows is a jubilant evening. It’s the kind of evening where spirits are high and the audience can be encouraged to clap along — even to sing along — with minimal provocation from the artist. Everyone is just into it.

Even opening the show on a mellow note, sitting at the piano for “Cherry On Top,” is greeted with enthusiasm that’s equalled when she rolls into the more directly dancey “Pyromaniac”. That’s because Nanna Øland Fabricius herself is a performer in all of the best, most over-the-top senses. She’s the type who will thrash around behind her piano (or at least chair dance — everyone who has their headphones on while at work knows what I mean), throwing up her arms she’s going to do a trust fall with the same energy that she uses to bounce around the stage when not being the piano.

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She shows her vocal range often by stripping back arrangements for quiet intros that burst into rousing pop numbers, and with songs like “3 Chances,” performed primarily  with just her and guitar, allowing her to demure at the microphone. Her backing band can’t be undervalued either, not just as musicians, but also as vocalists — in particular, Katrine Enevoldsen matches Fabricius in strength, and the difference between having live backing vocals of that calibre versus a prerecorded track is huge.

Between songs, Fabricius is chatty, cracking jokes, teasing her American guitarist in Danish and then having to translate for him, and upping audience call and answers into elaborate, operatic scales. Nothing about Fabricius is too earnest, and that’s key. Even during her more serious songs, she still has a smile on her face, which is why she can pull off a lot of the hands-in-the-air, palms aloft moments. You readily believe that she’s just as cool as she is goofy. As a live performer, there’s more than one angle that she can play, in precisely the same way her songs span the sensitive and sweet to the straight up pop tunes.

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