Online music magazine based in Copenhagen, Denmark

Monthly archive

July 2014

LIVE REVIEW: Television, Pumpehuset, 29.08.2014

in Live Reviews by

It’s understandable why bands have whole albums tours. Maybe it’s an anniversary, maybe those are the songs the crowds shout for at gigs anyway, or maybe, in the case of Television and Marquee Moon, it is a landmark work worth trotting across the globe decades later. Whatever the motivation, the formula makes sense.

But why do crowds go to whole album shows? Even if they saw the band when it originally toured around the release of that album, this is not the same effect. What in this nostalgic urge makes seeing the whole album performed live better than reminiscing at home with the record, knowing that other favorites only have the slightest chance of making it into the encore?

In the case of Television, it helps tremendously that they play Marquee Moon out of order, and thus makes the evening at least somewhat less predictable. They do begin with album opener “See No Evil,” and it’s not the strongest of starts. Tom Verlaine’s voice sounds shaky on the chorus, but as they recover from this, it becomes apparent that his voice is no longer able to hit the high notes.

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That’s hardly a death knell for the performance. Guitar solos are more integral to their sound, and it’s so easy to lose yourself in any of their ambling outros. There are a few surprises, such as the outro of “Torn Curtain” where Verlaine scratches his guitar strings and unexpectedly affects the sound of violins. It is no surprise, however, that “Marquee Moon” closes out the main set. It is the logical conclusion, and really, a ten-minute epic — stretched to 13 minutes on this occasion — would have been the logical conclusion to the recorded album.

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There is one thing making it difficult to enjoy the show, and that is the overwhelming heat. Though it’s breezy and cooler in Copenhagen than it’s been in a week, it is Seventh Circle of Hell hot in Pumpehuset. It’s sweat dripping down every inch of you even though you’re not moving hot. People are standing as far away from each other as possible, and the air is so thick and so still that there’s a breeze when a person walks past you. How much this contributes to the general low energy in the room is hard to say, because it’s kind of hard to breathe. But that’s hardly the fault of Television.

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Photos by Ronald Laurits Jensen

NEW ALBUM: The Raveonettes – Pe’ahi

in Blog/New Music by

The Raveonettes released their latest album, Pe’ahi, this week. It’s a nice surprise for fans, who weren’t informed that the album was coming out until its street date.

Aside from the lack of advanced promotion, the Danish duo of Sune Rose Wagner and Sharin Foo have taken a relatively standard approach with Pe’ahi. It’s available for download through the usual channels, and there’s a limited edition (1000 copies) vinyl that comes in a liquid-filled sleeve. They’re currently offering a free download of the track “Sisters” through their website.

If you stream the album on Spotify, there’s also the option to hear 30-60 seconds of commentary prior to each track. Listen to album opener, “Endless Sleeper,” below:

VIDEO: Ice Cream Cathedral – “Equilibrium”

in Blog/New Music by

Danish space poppers Ice Cream Cathedral has released a new video “Equilibrium”.  The video, a little horror story, is made by Anne Gry Kristensen and Italian director Roberto Di Vito.

“Equilibrium” is the second single from the album Sudden Anatomy that came out in May.

 

Roskilde Festival 2014 (PHOTOS)

in Photos by

Photos by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com) and Morten Aagaard Krogh (www.makrogh.com)

Earl Sweatshirt (Photo by Tom Spray)

Earl Sweatshirt – Photo by Tom Spray

Earl Sweatshirt (Photo by Tom Spray)

Earl Sweatshirt – Photo by Tom Spray

Electric Wizard (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Electric Wizard – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Outkast (photo by Tom Spray)

Outkast – Photo by Tom Spray

The Rolling Stones (Roskilde Festival 2014)

The Rolling Stones – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

The Rolling Stones (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Rolling Stones – Photo by Tom Spray

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

The Rolling Stones – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

The Master Musicians Of Jajouka with Bachir Attar (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Master Musicians Of Jajouka – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Roskilde Festival 2014

Roskilde Festival – Photo by Tom Spray

Connan Mockasin (Photo by Tom Spray)

Connan Mockasin – Photo by Tom Spray

Warpaint (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Warpaint – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Haim – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Haim – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

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Atmoshpere at Roskilde Festival – Photo by Tom Spray

Deftones (Photo by Tom Spray)

Deftones – Photo by Tom Spray

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Deftones – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Damon Albarn (Photo by Tom Spray)

Damon Albarn – Photo by Tom Spray

Damon Albarn (Photo by Tom Spray)

Damon Albarn – Photo by Tom Spray

Damon Albarn (Photo by Tom Spray)

Arena Stage at sunset – Photo by Tom Spray

Darkside (Photo by Tom Spray)

Darkside – Photo by Tom Spray

Darkside (Photo by Tom Spray)

Darkside – Photo by Tom Spray

Darkside (Photo by Tom Spray)

Futrue Islands crowd- Photo by Tom Spray

Future Islands (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Future Islands – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Future Islands (Photo by Tom Spray)

Future Islands – Photo by Tom Spray

Atomic Bomb! Who is William Onyeabor? (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Atomic Bomb – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Omar Souleyman (Photo by Tom Spray)

Omar Souleyman – Photo by Tom Spray

Omar Souleyman (Photo by Tom Spray)

Omar Souleyman crowd – Photo by Tom Spray

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Festival goers – Photo by Tom Spray

Manu Chao (Photo by Tom Spray)

Manu Chao – Photo by Tom Spray

Mano Chao (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Manu Chao – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Arctic Monkeys (Photo by Tom Spray)

Arctic Monkeys – Photo by Tom Spray

Arctic Monkeys (Photo by Tom Spray)

Arctic Monkeys – Photo by Tom Spray

Arctic Monkeys (Photo by Tom Spray)

Arctic Monkeys – Photo by Tom Spray

Spids Nøgenhat (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Spids Nøgenhat – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Interpol (Photo by Tom Spray)

Interpol – Photo by Tom Spray

Interpol (Photo by Tom Spray)

Interpol – Photo by Tom Spray

The Men (Roskilde Festival 2014)

The Men – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Slowdive – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Deerhunter – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Julia Holter – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Kasabian (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kasabian – Photo by Tom Spray

Kasabian (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kasabian crowd – Photo by Tom Spray

MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

MØ – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

MØ (Photo by Tom Spray)

MØ – Photo by Tom Spray

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Forest Swords – Photo by Tom Spray

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Forest Swords – Photo by Tom Spray

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Jack White – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Roskilde Festival 2014, Sunday 6th July

in Live Reviews by

Deerhunter

After several days of stage theatrics and moody band introductions, it’s a surprise and a pleasure to see Deerhunter conducting their own soundcheck. Frontman Bradford Cox’s awkward charm does more to connect with the audience than any set of laser displays or smoke machines. As the band launch into “Agoraphobia”, the refrain of “comfort me” seems particularly apt, a love letter to the warmth and comfort of the shoegaze bands that inspire it. But Deerhunter replace the ethereal quality of bands like Slowdive with a certain degree of quirkiness which is clear in Cox’s stage banter as much as in his music. After regaling us with a description of a 4th of July celebration chez Deerhunter, the band launch into “Nothing Ever Happened”, drawing out its motorik energy until it starts to melt into a cover of Patti Smith’s “Horses”. A moment of brilliant free-association genius, and a great begging to Sunday at Roskilde.

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(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Julia Holter

The warmth and energy of Deerhunter are replaced with an almost unbearable heat and humidity inside Gloria, where we wait for Julia Holter. But that same discomfort put this reviewer into a mind frame that perfectly suited the David Lynchian-quality of Holter’s music. The avant-garde singer-songwriter is accompanied by a drummer, a cellist, a violist, and a tenor-saxophonist. The effect is altogether different than that of her latest record, Loud City Song: the noise, reverb and general swirliness of the album are replaced with a crisp, stripped-back sound, as intimate as it is unsettling. “Maxim’s I” is transformed from the kind of song you’d expect to be heard in a Twin Peaks road bar into something closer to jazz or minimalist classical music. The intimacy is helped by Holter’s approach to her audience: offhand questions about what wine people in the front are drinking turn the affair into a secluded, friendly if off-kilter microcosm.

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Julia Holter (Roskilde Festival 2014)

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Kasabian

I have this image in my mind of Kasabian sitting around a few weeks before a tour or album release. Guitarist Sergio Pizzorno turns to frontman Tom Meighan and says “mate, why are we still doing this? We’re not even that great.” Meighan puts his hand on Pizzorno’s shoulder and says “Serge, it’s because we’re massive LADS!” They then discuss ‘banter’ or something. At Roskilde, the vision becomes reality as Meighan makes exactly the same motions with his (relatively sparse) audience. It’s about half an hour before their set is due to start, and they’ve summoned only a few dozen to wait in line for the pit. This is the same band who closed Glastonbury. Why have they failed to crack Denmark? The majority of the small group waiting are all British. The lone Dane standing next to me says his friends didn’t even want to come with him to watch. Maybe Danes don’t really go for lead singers who look like Eye Ball Paul from Kevin And Perry Go Large, but it’s entirely their loss.

Meighan is unashamedly confident and cocky, but he justifies his behaviour onstage, introducing the band as ‘The Mighty Kasabian’. He engages with the audience by pointing and waving his tongue at them, and between songs stands pouting triumphantly on the edge of the stage, beckoning the crowd to shower him and his band with all the woops and claps they can muster. Basking in praise comes naturally, he relishes it, and shows enough vitality in everything he does to make it work. Who gives a fuck if his audience is only half full; as long as a few people are enjoying it, he can hype them up enough to adequately rub his ego.

From opening track ‘Bumble Bee’ taken from new album 48:13, to closing number ‘Fire’, which is extended and dedicated to Leicester, the performance is unfailing. The final track sees Meighan and Pizzorno telling everyone to bounce on the ground for the guitar riff, before jumping incessantly for the rip roaring chorus line. It’s got even more energy than the actions for ‘Vlad the Impaler’, which followed a similar routine. As the rest of the band depart, Meighan sings, surprisingly well, the chorus line from ‘I Just Called To Say I Love You’ a capella. A few punters are still screaming the riff from ‘Fire’ after the band have left and the hosts have stepped on. The only disappointment is the lack of encore.

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Kasabian (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Kasabian (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

 

MØ: How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love your plait and scrunchie combo. I love the tennis skirt and dirty trainers you’re wearing. I love your complete disregard for the ‘No Crowdsurfing’ rule. From kangaroo jumps three feet in the air to sprawling onto the ground and singing from the floor, watching MØ perform is a visual spectacle. It’s tiring just looking at her, as sweat drips from her forehead. Always in control, her voice never once falters or fails; it stays completely powerful and enchanting, as she accompanies herself with looped “huh”s and high pitched “ow”s. She’s a beautiful clash of soft feeling and urban style, both in look and sound.

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MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

MØ (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Stevie Wonder

If there’s a place for legends, the Orange Stage is it. From The Rolling Stones on Thursday, to Stevie Wonder on Sunday, it was the performance space for two entirely different but well loved acts, and the latter’s evening set brought the festival to a joyous end before a few thousand punters stayed on for Jack White. Wonder’s band is so extensive it takes several minutes to credit them all. For the entirety of the two hour set, the singer remains enthusiastic, engaging and encouraging of the audience to partake in his soul celebration. He introduces all his tracks with an invitation to “sing this”. The chorus forms the base of a hit track for him to sing over. This is not Wonder’s show alone; he ensures it belongs to the tens of thousands of tired, dirty spectators too. As he moves into ‘Ebony and Ivory’, the musician asks the crowd: “can you imagine how much people have missed out on because of the prejudices we have in this world?” and once again beckons for Roskilde to join him. “If you agree with me, sing… You can’t just talk about it, you have to be about it.” Whether the subject matter is love, adultery or racism, for Stevie Wonder, music is the channel through which people should come together and reach greatness, solidarity and power.

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Stevie Wonder (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Forest Swords

If Forest Swords’ Matt Barnes feels hard-done-by in his allocated slot—playing Gloria at the same time that Stevie Wonder and Moderat are playing the Orange Stage and Arena—he certainly doesn’t show it. The space that isn’t occupied by the scattered but enthralled audience is instead filled up with the Liverpool-based producer’s approach to dub music: lung-fizzling bass, unsettling samples, sharp keyboards and even the odd spaghetti-western-influenced guitars. Barnes is accompanied by a bassist, and divides his time brooding over the sampler, hunching over the keyboard or swaying around with his guitar. Tracks like “Thor’s Stone” and “The Weight of Gold” from his debut Engravings are without doubt some of the standout electronic songs of 2013, and are even more effective live.

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Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Jack White

Those of us who watched clips from Jack White’s set at Glastonbury last week knew what to expect for this, the concluding set at the Orange Stage: an expansive retrospective of his work, from the White Stripes to the Raconteurs and his solo work. His band band, including a fiddle-player and a lap-steel-guitarist, help to reinvent as much as they reproduce the sounds from his back-catalogue, adding a certain amount of country twang to the overdriven swagger of much of his later work. A slight hint of reserve blends in with the excitement as White begins his set with a drawn out jam of the White Stripes’ “Icky Thump”: is this going to be a display of utter indulgence, an artist at the height of his success revelling in his apparent freedom to do whatever he likes? That reserve is also to be found in White himself, who largely refrains from talking much in between songs except to get a little annoyed when the crowd doesn’t seem to know the lyrics to “Hotel Yorba”. “You guys speak English, right?” This is going south fast, but a split-second later White recovers by making some quip about his own level of English. Thankfully, the experience seems to humble him enough to really begin engaging with the crowd, rather than taking their adulation for granted. The extended jams end, and are replaced by a quick series of White Stripes medleys that drive the audience forward through slower songs from Lazaretto.

Throughout White pays tribute to fellow Detroit-native and predecessor on the stage, Stevie Wonder, and even makes the odd joke about sharing his doctor with Drake. It is clear in these moments that Jack White’s ability as an entertainer take precedence over his sometimes rather insular and self-aggrandizing approach to his “art”, and that on stage he is able to fully embrace that. A festival crowd might not know the lyrics to all his White Stripes songs, but they can end Roskilde on a jumping high with set closers “Steady as She Goes” and the obligatory, perennial “Seven Nation Army”. But even in this last instance, White doesn’t rest on his laurels, but reworks the song in such as way as to work best with a band of six rather than one of two. We can only apologize to poor Londoners, from whom apparently we snatched him at the last moment. Such is the power of Roskilde.

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(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Deerhunter | Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2014

in Photos by

Photos by Morten Aagaard Krogh (mortenkrogh.com)

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Deerhunter (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Deerhunter (Roskilde Festival 2014)

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Julia Holter | Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2014

in Photos by

Photos by Morten Aagaard Krogh (mortenkrogh.com)

Julia Holter (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Julia Holter (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Julia Holter (Roskilde Festival 2014)

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Julia Holter (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Forest Swords | Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2014

in Photos by

Photos by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

Forest Swords (Photo by Tom Spray)

MØ | Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2014

in Photos by

Photos by Morten Aagaard Krogh (mortenkrogh.com) and Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

MØ (Roskilde Festival 2014)

MØ (Photo by Tom Spray)

MØ (Photo by Tom Spray)

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