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July 2017

Roskilde Festival 2017: Day 4, 01.07.2017

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Circuit des Yeux’s only Danish shows before today were in Copenhagen and have only been at Jazzhouse (she gives them a nod of gratitude toward the end of the set). So it’s pleasantly surprising to see how many people have turned up for her set at Gloria, given that the rain has stopped as well. We’ve been taken with her tenor-range alto since the first time we saw her, but it was exciting to see her performing with a band instead of solo. She is bolstered by a drummer and violist (and a bit of programming), turning her sinister folk somewhere between rocking and terrifyingly demonic. She closed the set with a new song, so we hope this means she’ll be back again soon.

It doesn’t matter how many times we see Jenny Hval, if she’s playing live we’ll be there. The main reason is that we know that no matter how recently we’ve seen her, the performance itself is going to be different from the last time. A festival stage is a very different setting from a small club, but she compensated with her own take on volume, namely billowing sheets of plastic.

In addition to her usual person behind the control panel, she had another synth player/vocalist and a tuba player, both whom were occasionally called upon to abandon their instruments and leap around the stage while Jenny sang as though none of it was happening around her. It takes tremendous commitment to an idea to jump to the rhythm of an odd ball song while swinging around a big fuck off sheet of plastic like it’s a normal activity.

Slowdive have played Roskilde fairly recently, but not surprisingly their 2014 set at 02:30 wasn’t very highly attended. Not the case at their set at Avalon at what they refer to as a more reasonable hour of 18:00. Then they were riding on reunion buzz, but now they’re supporting a new album. They’ve balanced their set well, weaving in new songs with their back catalogue and still seemingly genuinely excited that they’re performing. Whether it’s Avalon’s sound system or the band’s own mixing choice, there’s a lot of bass in this performance, and it’s melodic and driving enough that we don’t mind that it matches the guitars in volume at all. Interestingly, it’s the new singles “Star Roving” and “Sugar for the Pill” that elicit the biggest cheers. It seems Slowdive have succeeded in introducing themselves to a completely new audience.

Some bands appear to have been specially designed and cultivated in a B-movie laboratory in order to headline a festival, and Arcade Fire are without a doubt one of the prime examples of this. The massive hooks and singalongs that sound more than a little bombastic on record make perfect sense in this massive muddy field. Opening with “Wake Up”, the band do just that, warming up the audience in record time, to the degree that it’s only a few minutes into the set that Win Butler has managed to jump on top of our very own Morten Aagard Krogh in the photo pit. New material from their soon-to-be-released fifth album, Everything Now, is carefully sandwiched between some of their more dance and electronica-leaning work, with the transition between “The Sprawl II” and “Reflektor” being particularly pleasing in its smoothness. Having whipped themselves up with an obvious closer like “Rebellion (Lies)”, Win insists on returning to the stage for one last goodbye, with “Neon Bible”.

It feels like a natural quiet ending, but ance outfit Moderat  – a hybrid of Berlin electronica acts Apparat (Sasha Ring) and dance duo Modeselektor (Gernot Bronsert and Sebastian Szary) – have other plans. The after-midnight gig lasted three hours (at the tail-end of a rainy festival, even our hardiest reviewer only lasted one) and cemented why the outfit has been much-hyped as the ultimate electronica live act. Pounding beats were accompanied by a visually-intricate light show, oscillating from pulsating singles with frenetic drums before moving into mid-tempo ambient tracks. The festival setting meant the volume was higher than any club, leaving a lasting impression of a powerful show for festival-goers to trudge home to.

Roskilde Festival 2017: Day 3, 30.06.2016

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Lorde live at Roskilde Festival 2017

Mud, mud, glorious mud. Nothing quite like it for sorting out the foolish from the prepared. Tramping around the festival site has become something of an adventure for the properly shod, and a nightmare for anyone in trainers.

Because some of us have grown up with the Foo Fighters forever in our sphere, and never make a great effort to change the station if one of their songs comes on the radio, we thought they should at least be worthy of half an hour of our time. Much of this half hour seemed to be devoted to Dave Grohl just shouting, introducing his band, and recalling the time he played Roskilde with Nirvana on the day that Denmark won the Euro Cup (though he didn’t mention Nirvana by name). They did play a couple of songs as well, but as their particular songwriting formula doesn’t allow for a whole lot of variation, we couldn’t tell you exactly which ones.

This hasn’t been a festival of many obvious clashes for us. One of the few was choosing between Lorde and the Avalanches. Lorde was clearly the hot act of the night — she probably should have been given an Orange stage slot. The crowd packed under the Arena tent, spilled several rows beyond that, and across the paved path with people finding slightly elevated spots near the urinals that gave them a decent vantage point. That’s the appeal of Lorde: People are willing to stand near piss troughs to see her.

Before she strode onto Arena stage, the audience was teased and tantalised with the opening bars of Kate Bush’s “Running up That Hill” – heralding a set built on the presence of an enigmatic performer (and unique, quirky dance moves). With a show bookended by her beloved hit “Tennis Court” and culminating in the pulsating, raw single “Green Light,” each song was met with roaring enthusiasm and energy from the crowd.

While some of the tracks lacked punch in the live setting – Lorde’s trademark mezzo soprano occasionally disappeared a little under the instrumentals and backing vocals – her presence filled the room so powerfully she had need for little else beyond her minimalist, pared-down set. In contrast to her lyrics, which often make jibes about fame and pretension, Lorde’s onstage banter felt carefully crafted to seduce the audience.  “Did you know I’m a witch?” she coos playfully. “I made the rain stop.”

She didn’t really. But a spell was certainly cast over Roskilde Festival Friday night.

Some of us only stayed for four or five songs, simply because we expect Lorde to be around for a while, but there’s no guarantee that the Avalanches won’t disappear again for another 15 years. The Australian duo first came into prominence with their debut Since I Left You, a technicolor riot of samples that meshed hiphop with lush orchestrations. This time round, with Wildflower, the Avalanches have turned up the swagger.

Tonight they have Spank Rock rapping for them, as if they needed more solid credentials, and Eliza Wolfgramm, who provides most of the sung vocals, has a pliable, soulful voice that is exactly what you want delivering “Since I Left You.” The fact that she does so while wielding a baseball bat makes it all the better.

It takes a lot of chutzpah to base a sizable portion of a set on samples from the Beach Boys and the Who, but the Avalanches have the skill and the conviction to fully pull it off. Behind them are projected clips of everything from the Big Lebowski to Jean Reno in Luc Besson’s wonderfully oddball 1985 Subway, as if to confirm that that the Avalanches have truly mastered the art of crowdpleasing. At their best, they can levitate you out of the mud.

 

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