Online music magazine based in Copenhagen, Denmark

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February 2018

LIVE REVIEW: Grandmaster Flash, Amager Bio, 23.02.2018

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Grandmaster Flash live in Copenhagen at Amager Bio

Grandmaster Flash throws a party on his own schedule. There’s a slow start to the evening at Amager Bio; a DJ has been spinning since the doors opened. About 15 minutes after the show was supposed to start, some break dancers run on stage and take turns showing off their old school moves. It’s fun and everyone in the crowd goes mad, but it only lasts 10-15 minutes, and then we wait another half hour for Grandmaster Flash himself to appear.

Things finally get started with a brief video about the history of scratching. This is formally the first part of the evening, in which Grandmaster Flash focuses on the legacy that has undoubtedly brought people out tonight, providing insight into his methods and his record collection. There’s also a camera set up on his rig synced to the screen behind him so we can watch him scratch in real time. It’s fun to watch, and considering this can all be done digitally now, it’s nice to appreciate the actual skill behind this approach.

This reflective state turns to a memoriam of hip-hop artists who’ve died: Phife Dawg, the Notorious B.I.G, Prodigy, Guru from Gang Starr, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, Big Pun, Heavy, MCA, Jam Master Jay, and Tupac Shakur. With the exception of Prodigy, enough time has passed since these artists’ deaths for the segment to feel celebratory rather than somber.

With a majority of these artists also hailing from New York City, there is a natural segue to Flash’s tour of the Five Boroughs (and Long Island). While the B-roll of street signs does start to wear thin, the narrative built around the show up to this point is impressive. It goes beyond nostalgia and becomes more of a history lesson.

But there is room for nostalgia. The reflective part of looking at the past is over, and now it’s time to hear 30 seconds of a song you love (or at least you know) before it cuts to the next track. Having had that extra hour to buy drinks, the audience is ready to oblige when asked for the umpteenth time to make some noise or throw their hands in the air. And even though a couple of drinks are flung for no reason and someone’s climbed on the stage and then been escorted out of the venue, this evening is joyful. Grandmaster Flash has instilled a sense of history in us, but the essence was always a good time.

Photo by James Hjertholm.

LIVE REVIEW: Ghostpoet, Vega, 11.02.2018

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Ghostpoet live at Lille Vega Copenhagen

It’s been a while since Obaro Ejimiwe, Ghostpoet, has played in Copenhagen, in this very same venue. The crowd, he jokes, has increased since then. A guest appearance with Massive Attack, and the reception for last year’s Dark Days + Canapés, will do that.

Another reason might be that all the opening bands’ schoolmates and parents seem to have showed up, lending the evening the feeling of a local gig, but if Ejimiwe notices the vibe he is too charming to mention it. In general the murkiness  of the material in his last album is contrasted by his open onstage persona, grooving along with the backing band. They open on perhaps the strongest track from Dark Day, the appropriately titled “Many Moods at Midnight”, with a simmering, Bad-Seed-channeling intensity.

Of course in a live settings a lot of the albums’ atmospherics are lost to the room, and Ejimiwe’s rather low-key vocal delivery sometimes struggles to cut through the band, who transpose the material into a decidedly more straight-forward indie rock tonality, all wiry guitars, grungy bass and some pleasant bleeps from a couple of nice Moog and Prophet synths. In this context songs like “X Marks the Spot” start to sound rather more like the Editors that I am comfortable with (the Editors being only the second most boring concert I have ever attended after Chvrches).

LIVE REVIEW: Circuit des Yeux, Alice, 10.02.2018

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circuit des yeux live at alice copenhagen

Circuit des Yeux has made reliable, yearly appearances in Denmark for the past few years, so it was appropriate and welcomed that she was the first performer we went out to see at our inaugural visit to the newly-opened Alice. The evening was set from the beginning to be reminiscent of something and somewhere else, seeing an artist who had made multiple visits to Jazzhouse playing in the remodeled Global, and debating whether or not the curtains had been moved from one location to another.

The focus shifted quickly when opener TALsounds took the stage. Her rich and romantic electronic music is built primarily around her voice and some piano being manipulated a dozen times while she hunches over various buttons. It was lovely and relaxed set, and TALsounds’ airy soprano seemed like it would be a polar opposite and perfect counterpart to frontwoman Haley Fohr’s alto.

That might be true of previous versions of Circuit des Yeux that we’ve seen. We were first taken with Fohr’s dramatic vocals when we saw her play a solo set, but Fohr’s voice has continued to develop in bold ways. She has now taken on theatrical, operatic ranges, leaping octaves with staggering control.

This is balanced nicely with Circuit des Yeux now touring as a band. Fohr was accompanied by drums and double bass, and backing musicians in addition to her samples (and some dramatic light projections) has also changed her performance style. Far from being hunched over her guitar with her hair in her face (as we first saw her), there’s a theatrical, almost imposing quality to Fohr’s stances. It was a nice pairing to hear her sing, “the arms ready to catch the fall” with her own arms stretch out in classic Greek theatre-style.

Her development in her comportment also makes Forh’s staccato vocal tricks that much more affecting. The vocal manipulation on its own is impressive, but with Fohr taking full possession of the space around her, the performance takes on an eerie, mystical element. She’s exciting to watch, and it’s exciting to consider what she’ll do next.

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh.

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