Online music magazine based in Copenhagen, Denmark

Monthly archive

January 2019

LIVE REVIEW: Anna von Hausswolff, Pumpehuset, 24.01.2019

in Live Reviews by
Anna von Hausswolff live at Pumpehuset Copenhagen

It’s a failing on our part that we haven’t seen Anna von Hausswolff play in three years. There has been ample opportunity at festivals or if we could be bothered to cross the Sound to Malmø, and we simply didn’t do it. So in our minds, von Hausswolff remained frozen in that performance at Jazzhouse (RIP) back in 2016 when things were strangely serene except for a sub-bass that made our intestines rattle.

Who can say how long we’ve been missing out on her performance as it is today, which is to say, far from serene. The main room at Pumpehuset has taken on a cavernous feel augmented by the 15 minutes of windblown sound effects that play before she comes out on stage.

The set opens with “The Truth, the Glow, the Fall,” and the effect is immediate. To hear her voice echo around the room is really quite extraordinary; her recordings are so dense and she smooths her vocals into the mix so softly that it comes as a shock to the system that her high notes have so much force behind them. Her backing band seem so dense and lush until she starts singing, then it suddenly seems like they’re exercising tremendous restraint.

Beyond the blare of her vocals, there’s a distinctive performance personality that von Hausswolff has developed since we saw her last. She no longer confines herself to behind her keys. Instead we see her dancing and thrashing about during the percussion-heavy interlude of “Ugly and Vengeful,” playing a 12-string guitar on “The Mysterious Vanishing of Electra,” and using her encore to wander through the crowd while singing her as-yet unreleased song “Gösta.” “Pomperipossa” sounds like a haunted house soundtrack with bouncy synths and ear piecing shrieks. People around us cover their ears as she stretches her vocals to their highest decibel. “Am I scaring you?” she wails. Yes! Absolutely! Give us more! While von Hausswolff is as connected to her performance as ever, it feels less like she’s in her own world and more like the audience is being brought along for a strange ride. 

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh.

LIVE REVIEW: Algiers, Hotel Cecil, 15.01.2019

in Live Reviews by
Algiers live at Hotel Cecil, Copenhagen

Atlanta four-piece Algiers have been making a name for themselves since their 2015 debut for their fiery energy and political lyrics. If you read about them in the music press, the ubiquity of the words “industrial” and “gospel” might have you imagining a cross between Einstürzende Neubauten and the Golden Gate Quartet. But of course that is total guff: this is fast-paced blues-inflected indie rock, with a few chains and distortion pedals thrown in for good measure.

Which is to say, fundamentally, that Algiers are a pretty fun night out. And although a rainy Tuesday in Copenhagen is not generally conducive to an energetic atmosphere, it doesn’t take long before bassist Ryan Mahan’s manic bouncing and vogueing starts to infect the audience.

If you were to watch them without hearing the unifying element of their music, you could easily imagine the four members of Algiers were in totally different bands playing at the same time: Mahan in some abrasive dance act; frontman Franklin James Fisher–in his bandana, skinny jeans and leather jacket–straight out of a blue-rock act; pin-striped guitarist Lee Tescher goes for the serious-faced noise act; and of course noughties indie-rockers will remember will remember drummer Matt Tong from Bloc Party.

Algiers live at Hotel Cecil, Copenhagen

What unites them is their energy and conviction: instruments are tossed aside with reckless abandon, choruses are chanted with a fury that renders the mics superfluous. Amid the pogoing and dancing, the night is punctuated by samples of speeches and lectures, which strike an oddly didactic tone, as if it were necessary to justify the fun with some Foucault quotes.

Combined with their interest in political theory, it’s not hard to see why Algiers have become critical darlings after the release of their second record, The Underside of Power. But two years have passed since that record, and tonight, as well as anthems like “Death March” and “The Underside of Power”, we are treated to some newly-written songs, angry and anthemic as ever.

Go to Top