Online music magazine based in Copenhagen, Denmark

Author

Here Today - page 2

Here Today has 504 articles published.

Here Today’s Albums of the Year of 2016

in Blog by

We’re not going to spend time talking about what a brutal year 2016 was for music lovers. Regardless of what genre you favor, 2016 was a year that took someone away from you. And while that might be the most immediately enduring sentiment about the past year, it’s necessary to take strength in the incredible music that was released this year. In the past 12 months, we’ve been blown away by newcomers and watched artists we’ve been rooting for all along come into their own. We’ve welcomed back old friends and received beautiful goodbyes from heroes. It’s because it’s been such an extraordinarily, musically rich year that we’ve made it through at all. These are our favorites:

Angel Olsen Live in Copenhagen

Angel Olsen
MY WOMAN
[Jagjaguwar]

It’s two short years ago that Angel Olsen first captured our hears, but she’s come a long way from her minimalist, finger-picked solo guitar tracks. On MY WOMAN, Angel builds out her dreamiest moments into vast washes of rumbling guitar with vague memories of folk somewhere in the distance. This hasn’t stopped her from writing snappy pop songs or experimenting with synthesizers. Her vocals are just as moving as ever, but where quiet whispers were once her stock and trade, there is real evidence that Angel could be a leading rock vocalist of her generation.

And that’s what is so exciting about both Angel and this record: On MY WOMAN, she shows not only that an understanding of what she does so well, but that her own potential is limitless. More to the point, we can see now that she’s ambitious enough to follow that potential it wherever it takes her. — AF

Puce Mary (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Puce Mary
The Spiral
[Posh Isolation]

When Puce Mary released The Spiral, her third LP, she played a release concert at Mayhem, and the performance she gave is a serious contender to being the most intense of 2016. Stripped of the insane decibels, Puce Mary’s confrontational yet trance-like stage appearance, the lights and the smoke, The Spiral is still a captivating experience. The eight tracks on the album are very distinct, yet they blend together forming a whole that sucks you in as it progresses. Puce Mary is a master of contrasts, her music is brutal yet subtle, even fragile, and even though compositions are industrial, her music feels alive like an organism.

Last but not least:  It sounds amazing. The noise, the textures, the strange field recordings, the distorted vocals. The Spiral is an intense and demanding record, but also truly inspiring and in it’s own, complex way beautiful. — MAK

Mitski live Copenhagen Loppen

Mitski
Puberty 2
[Dead Oceans]

While it seemed as though she appeared from nowhere to make us get in touch with our feelings, Mitski has been toiling away for years now. Her fourth album, Puberty 2, perfectly combines her prolific efforts with a youthful perspective and energy and just enough life experience to make you believe her. The album is full of subtle bleeps and horn flourishes, but watching her play stripped back versions of the album was a highlight of the year.

It takes a good amount of self-awareness to call your album Puberty 2, and so much of its charm is her unabashed willingness to be awkward — which somehow also makes her the coolest girl in the room. You will feel like Mitski just gets you, and you’re probably giving yourself too much credit. We definitely understand the impulse, though. — AF

Kanye West
The Life of Pablo
[GOOD]

The Life of Pablo is a tricky, slippery thing of an album. Less of an album, really, than a saga, an half year long event tracking the evolution of an album. But really, it’s just a collection of some very good tracks by a producer who, whatever else he might be, is also touched by genius. From Nina Simone and Arthur Russel, via Chicago house, to Frank Ocean and Desiigner, Kanye’s sample palette is as diverse, crazy and unique as ever.

In 2013 Kanye West marked the death of physical media with the cover of Yeesus, an “open casket to CDs”. That was an album full of energy joyous destruction. It seems fitting that with The Life of Pablo, Ye confronts us with the direct evidence of the technical and emotional demands of the new dominant technology. Keep it loopy. — CC

Cate Le Bon live

Cate Le Bon
Crab Day
[Drag City]

There is a feeling of kinship that runs through Cate Le Bon’s music, that if you yourself have ever toed the line between interesting and just strange leads her to sound identifiable even in her most abstract images. Le Bon is a master of oddball pop songs, with her ramshackle style of guitar playing and many unique turns of phrase.

Crab Day demonstrates the same dry vocal delivery that has always set her apart and given her music so much personality, but this time she’s pushed herself and her sound to new depths. She’s stretch her vocal range and brought a new emotional connection to her songs, which is emphasized in her commitment to her visual lyrics. She’s also introduced some legitimate guitar solos to her work. Album closer “What’s Not Mine” stretches to seven minutes of everything we find charmingly off kilter about Cate Le Bon’s music, which is to say, it’s perfect. — AF

Fat White Family performing live at Loppen (photo: Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Fat White Family
Songs for Our Mothers
[Fat Possum]

Few bands are able to channel hatred with the pure intensity and conviction of the Fat White Family. If this is their “difficult second album”, the difficulty lies more in their own physiological limitations, rather than in a lack of ideas or direction. Songs for Our Mothers promised to “dance to the beat of human hatred”, but little did we know back in January the degree to which that emotion would imprint itself in 2016.

Harold Shipman, Ike Turner, Goebbels: the gleeful offensiveness of the cast goes hand in hand with a deeper moral outrage, as the Family wrap themselves further and further in darkness, with only their humour and some wicked riffs for support. There’s no knowing what the next year will bring, but we can only hope the Fat White Family will be around, in some form, to rage against it. — CC

Jenny Hval
Blood Bitch
[Sacred Bones]

On the face of it, this is a synthpop album about female vampires. But anyone approaching Jenny Hval’s latest album with the expectation of a thematically-coherent concept album clearly hasn’t been paying attention. Jenny’s dark and aloof sense of humour are present in all her work, and particularly on stage, and this year’s effort manages to be a lot stranger than it promised to be.

Though there are undeniably some very lush synth pieces on this record, particularly in its two singles, “Female Vampire” and “Conceptual Romance”, we don’t necessarily rush to Jenny for her tunes, but rather for the oddities that surround them. A moment of creepy melancholy in “Untamed Region” (I told you she was funny) is punctuated by a clip of documentarian Adam Curtis talking about the helpless confusion that seems to characterise our era. Jenny Hval isn’t pretending to guide us out of that confusion, but what she builds upon it well worth the listen.

— CC

PJ Harvey
The Hope Six Demolition Project
[Island Recordings]

The Hope Six Demolition Project is the follow up to the Mercury Prize winning album Let England Shake, and PJ Harvey continues along the same lines collaborating with Mick Harvey, John Parish, Flood and documentary photographer/filmaker Seamus Murphy. But this time she has taken a more conceptual approach and adopted a role as a sort of singer/songwriter journalist reporting from her travels to Kosovo, Afghanistan and Washington D.C. This also applies to the recording process, that was framed as a performance open to the public. While some critics have expressed skepticism about the mix of music and reporting, we applaud her exploration of music as vehicle for change, and together with the albums distinct sound, musical quality and her impressive live performance this earns her a place on our list.

Honorable Mentions

Marissa Nadler – Strangers

Nick Cave – Skeleton Tree

Iggy Pop – Post Pop Depression

Kevin Morby – Singing Saw

Tindersticks – The Waiting Room

Danny Brown – Antrocity Exhibition

Lambchop – Fotus

Frank Ocean – Blonde

Factory Floor – 2525

Holy Fuck – Congrats

Kate Tempest – Let Them Eat Chaos

A Tribe Called Quest – We got it from Here… Thank You 4 Your service

PHOTOS: Bob Hund, Loppen, 24.11.2016

in Photos by
Bob hund

Photos by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Trailerpark Festival

in Live Reviews by

By  Morten Aagaard Krogh (mortenkrogh.com) and Charlie Cassarino

The tenth Trailerpark Festival was also announced to be the last; not because of lack of interest or finances, but because the team behind Trailerpark Festival wished to move on. A new festival is on they way, they say, and perhaps Trailerpark I/O, the new branch on this years Trailerpark Festival, is a hint of what to expect.

Trailerpark I/O preceded the music on Friday, centering around a variety of themes, including surveillance societies, virtual worlds, conversational interfaces, computational creativity and responsive materials. These themes where explored through talks, exhibitions, talent showcases, films and labs. Here are some of the highlights from the exhibitions:

An EEG sensor detects certain brain waves which are then displayed as gif's. Just meditate, the man was told.
Wear What You Think – An EEG sensor detects certain brain waves which are then displayed as gif’s. Just meditate, the man was told.

WEAR WHAT YOU THINK was one of the first installations you encountered in the exhibition area. Here you where outfitted with a consumer grade EEG-device programmed to detect brainwave patterns; these where then translated into .gifs pulled from giphy.com and projected back onto the subject wearing a white, reflective poncho.

I SEE YOU, the neighbouring installation , used similar technology. Developed by Great Works CPH, the project reflected on data collection, surveillance, privacy and transparency by displaying gifs relating to the conversations going on inside the installation. As with Wear What You Think the gifs where pulled from giphy. A handheld version using a Rasperry pie was also available.

This sci-fi setup is actually an exploration of haptics and music
Resonate by De Nakke Ontwerpers is an exploaration of haptics and music. The suits each contain 10 vibrating that adds another element to the music played in the headphones.

SHE & HE: A LOVE STORY BETWEEN TWO COMPUTERS by Mer/Sea & Iregular was a charming little installation staging a conversation between two computes by pulling randomly selected phrases from social media. The project was very reminiscent of Jonathan Harris’s 2008 installation at MOMA entitled I Want You To Want Me

In the Talents, Talks and Labs section you could employ Doliio’s Autonomous Self-Agent  to take care of your social media presence, meet a 3D printer-turned-tattoo-artist, a concept for decentralized furniture production and various virtual reality projects. Being able to try out new technologies, chat with the makers, listen to talks in an informal setting was a good, engaging experience and nice warm up for the music scheduled later on the day.

3D printer converted to a tatoo machine
A geek tatoo on an artificial hand made by 3D printer converted into a tattoo machine by Appropriate Audiences

 

Lynda Joy's virtual reality project lets people experience being a painter from a painters point of view.
Lynda Joy’s virtual reality project lets people experience being a painter from the artist’s point of view.
Section Boys puffing it
Section Boys puffing it

After an afternoon of encounters on the frontiers of technology, it’s back to business as usual at Trailer Park, which means four stages with music from the cutting edge of the Danish and internation pop, electornic and hiphop scenes. South London crew Section Boyz made up for their late appearance with as intense as they were visibly stoned. But the home-grown acts are the ones on everyone’s lips, particularly the r’n’b stylings of Phlake, the blissed out pop of Slowes and the baritone-voiced electronica of Wangel. And just in case the latter three were too laid back for you, Icelanders Sykur were ready to kick the crowd back into life with their aggressively catchy electronica.

So, Trailer Park, goodbye to a decade at Enghave skatepark. What’s in store for the next 10 years?

 

The decorated trailers are still a part of trailerpark festival
The decorated trailers are still a part of trailerpark festival
Phlake
Phlake
Dagny
Dagny
Slowes
Slowes
Wangel
Wangel
Crowd (Section Boyz)
Crowd (Section Boyz)
Sykur
Sykur.
M.I.L.K.
M.I.L.K.

SESSION: CTM

in Sessions by

CTM stands for for Cæcilie Trier Musik and it is the alias of the Danish cellist, singer and composer Cæcilie Trier’s main musical project. Live CTM is a duo consisting of Cæcilie Trier on vocals and pianist Malthe Rostrup. A while ago the two stopped by Black Tornado Studios where they recorded two songs from Suite for a Young Girl – CTM’s 2016 debut released by Danish record label Tambourhinoceros and the follow up to the highly acclaimed EP Variations from 2013. We are proud to present the first song from the session ‘Escorted/The Road’. 

Cæcilie Trier is also known for other musical projects. She has been the cellist in Choir of Young Believers and she is also a part of the experimental vocal group Valby Vokalgruppe. This year she has been playing with Marching Church (signed to Sacred Bones) and last but not least she is known for her former solo project Chimes & Bells (signed to Bella Union).

Cæcilie is part of what many describe as the Mayhem Scene in Copenhagen – a collaborative space in Copenhagen where the likes of Synd & Skam, Iceage, Marching Church, Lower, Andreas Führer, Puce Mary, Communions and others are based. All with different musical expressions. They share rehearsal studios, put up shows and sometimes work directly with each others’ music – as when Cæcilie Trier recently played cello on Lower’s “Expanding Horizons”.

If you are in Copenhagen on Wednesday the 6. of July 2016 you’ll have the opportunity to experience her live in a very special setting: Arbejdermuseets Festsal (tickets here). It will be her first concert in Copenhagen since the sold out show at Jazzhouse 12. February and she will be joined by Dawda Jobarteh (kora), Asger Hartvig (saxophone) Maja Malou Lyse (speak) and of course Malthe Rostrup on piano. The concert is a part of ‘Something Else’, the alternative concert theme of Copenhagen Jazz Festival.

Credits:

Sound and mixing: Troels Damgaard Holm
Master: Nikolaj Vinten
Film crew: Morten Aagaard Krogh, Hilmar Darri Flygenring, Johannes Leszinski
Produced by Here Today

PHOTOS: Roskilde Festival 2016, Day 4

in Photos by
Mø

Mø live at Roskilde Festival 2016
Mø – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Mø live at Roskilde Festival 2016
Mø – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Mø live at Roskilde Festival 2016
Mø – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Mø live at Roskilde Festival 2016
Mø – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

New Order

new order live roskilde festival

New Order, Arena, by Tom Spray

Protomartyr

Protomartyr - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Protomartyr – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Protomartyr - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Protomartyr – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Protomartyr - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Protomartyr – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Gojira

Gojira- Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Gojira- Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Gojira- Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Gojira- Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Gojira - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Gojira – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Cate Le Bon

cate le bon live roskilde festival
Photo by Tom Spray

Guardian Alien

Guardian Alien - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Guardian Alien – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Guardian Alien - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Guardian Alien – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Guardian Alien - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Guardian Alien – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Guardian Alien - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Guardian Alien – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

LCD Soundsystem

LCD Soundsystem - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
LCD Soundsystem – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
LCD Soundsystem - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
LCD Soundsystem – Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

LIVE REVIEW: Roskilde Festival 2016, Day 4, 02.07.2016

in Live Reviews by

Guardian Alien — Pavilion

We didn’t know exactly what to expect from Guardian Alien as the band is constantly changing. Once the solo project of Greg Fox (of Friday’s Fox Millions Duo), the current incarnation has him paired with guitarist and vocalist Alexandra Drewchin with each of them queuing up tracks from laptops.

guardian alien live roskilde festival
Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Though Guardian Alien is nominally thought of as Fox’s project, Drewchin steals the show. It’s not just that as the guitarist she’s more mobile than the drummer — her vocals have a wacky range between her natural soprano and an evil vocal effect, her guitar playing uses effects that make it look like an optical illusion, and she’s twisting her body in an awe-inspiring way. When she bends over backwards and sings while facing the crowd upside-down it proves to be particular popular. When faced with addressing the crowd through heavily reverbed vocals or heavily distorted vocals, she often opts for the demonically distorted vocals. She’s fucking with us, she wants us to know it, and it’s hilarious.

There’s not much more that can be said about Fox’s drumming that we haven’t already said, but this current combination for Guardian Alien belies a playfulness that contrasts nicely with the weight of the music. It’s a little bit tribal, a little bit demonic, and perhaps the most concrete project he’s working on right now. — AF

Gojira – Arena

After touring their latest album, “Magma”, apparently French metallers Gojira have been on a bit of a break. “We’re really rusty” claims frontman Joe Duplantier, whose facial hair today makes him look remarkably like Alan Rickman playing the Sheriff of Nottingham in that shit Robin Hood movie. That’s not a diss, it’s a solid look. Either way, evidently Gojira’s definition of ‘rusty’ is brutally unforgiving. The 1/32-note kick-drum tears through the audience, driving the business-suited gentleman next to me to froth at the mouth with glee. The metal audience at Roskilde will always be a minority, but they definitely get their fill. And if nothing else, they did a solid job of drowning out the sound of Dizzy Miss Lizzy from the Orange Stage. And for that I shall be eternally grateful. – CC

gojira live roskilde festival
Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Cate Le Bon — Pavilion

Cate Le Bon plays whimsical pop songs that she delivers with a dry voice (think of “dry” in the same positive light as when it’s used to describe wines). Her vocals live are note-perfect to their recordings, which is precisely what we were hoping for. The only disappointment is that she doesn’t have more small talk between songs, because she speaks with the same delightful lilt as she sings.

cate le bon live roskilde festival
Photo by Tom Spray

Le Bon’s set is mostly comprised of songs from her latest album, Crab Day, which in addition to allowing her to hit the high notes also have her backing band shuffling around instruments. There are times when the bass is too high in the mix, and this drowns out the keyboard in particular, but there is plenty of ramshackle guitar to propel things forward.

And though the aforementioned dryness of Le Bon’s voice is a huge selling point, it is not without emotion. Highlights from the set included “What’s Not Mine” and “Are You With Me Now,” which, for all their forthrightness, leave us wandering back out into the cloudy Saturday in a slightly ruminative state. — AF

New Order — Arena

New Order were always going to be a bit of a wild card, the legacy band that doesn’t want to be a legacy band and doesn’t want to play by the rules. The obvious choice would be for them open their set with a hit, and instead they choose “Singularity” from last year’s album, Music Complete.

new order live roskilde festival
Photo by Tom Spray

While there were some reminders that the band do in fact have a new album, they were forthcoming with singles from throughout their back catalogue, with tracks new and old complemented by stunning short films. The vocals could have been louder, and it was a little difficult to understand Bernard Sumner’s lyrics and his between-song quips. Still, it’s hard to describe the collective euphoria of a packed tent of people singing and dancing along to “Blue Monday” — except for the band themselves, who played to the new wave parody of standing stock still despite the energy of the people in front of them.

After we walked away from the crowd, having been told that “Temptation” was all they had to offer and jabbering about how bands don’t play encores at festivals and anyway New Order had a reputation for not playing encores at all, we heard the cheers erupting from the tent and the opening bass line of “Love Will Tear Us Apart.” Needless to say, we made our way back to Arena very quickly. Several people told us afterward that they were moved to tears, and at least one of us feels no shame to count herself amongst them. — AF

LCD Soundsystem – Orange

It has been a day of highs and lows. Guardian Alien’s thrilling set in the early afternoon, friends in tears over New Order’s encore, and crucially, having to witness Italy lose to penalties against Germany. But all is not over: I am in the pit at Orange Stage, about to see LCD Soundsystem.

Five years ago the band had bid the world farewell with an already legendary three-hour show in Madison Square Garden. Their return this year was greeted both with enthusiasm and a fair bit of scepticism. After all, why invalidate such a brilliant swansong? But as soon as the band begin to trickle onto the stage to the beat of “Us V Them”, the answer seems self-evident: because it’s simply too fun to stop.

LCD Soundsystem - Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh
Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

The set itself flawlessly balances material from all periods of the band’s existence, including a personal favourite, the caustic and hilarious “Losing My Edge”. There is a triumphal, assured quality to everything James Murphy and his merry companions do on stage. From this vantage point you can see his expression as he grins and gurns at the band with his back to the audience. They’re all drinking champagne, playing some of the best dance music made in the last twenty years. For the first few songs it looks like they are playing more for each other than anyone out in the fields of Roskilde. But eventually Murphy looks to the audience and professes his surprise and gratitude that so many people have stayed on in spite of the cold and the mud. Suddenly what looked like arrogance begins to resemble more a genuine joy for the music.

Perhaps LCD Soundsystem’s greatest legacy will be their ability to both narrate and enact the pleasure of music as a shared experience. The ability to be both incisive and fun. But to me, they shall forever more be remembered as the band that gave birth to the first ever Here Today editorial dance party. – CC

PHOTOS: Roskilde Festival 2016, Day 3

in Photos by
tal national live roskilde festival

Photos by Morten Krogh and Tom Spray.

DSC_0410

mac demarco live roskilde festival

DSC_0793

DSC_0921

DSC_0961

Colin Stetson & Sarah Neufeld__MG_6592

peaches live roskilde festival

Fox Millions Duo live roskilde festival

tal national live roskilde festival

mutoid man live roskilde festival

 

LIVE REVIEW: Roskilde Festival 2016 Day 3, 01.07.2016

in Live Reviews by
peaches live roskilde festival

 Reviews by Charlie Cassarino and Amanda Farah. Photos by Morten Krogh and Tom Spray.

Fox Millions Duo — Gloria

An hour of two drummers doing there thing sounds like a hard sell. What on earth would they possibly do for all that time?

But Greg Fox and Kid Millions are two of the best drummers in New York. Their day jobs in Liturgy and Oneida respectively constantly push them outside of your standard rock drumming, and they’re not afraid to let things get a little weird. They spend the first twenty minutes of the set sat on either side of a snare drum with a backing track fading in and out over them, Kid Millions with a serene, trance-like expression on his face the whole while (Fox is a bit more fidgety, though it’s impressive watching him get up and shift around without it affecting his playing).

Fox Millions Duo live roskilde festival

Watching each man at his own drum kit has a different feel. The delirium of the first song has evaporated from Kid Millions, and he’s now pulling faces as though it’s his college roommate sitting across the stage. The two communicate through a series of nods, with a synchronicity that is boggling. They are so in synch, at one point they each cast an empty water bottle on the ground at the same time.

If experimental music can lack an organic element, the Fox Millions project makes up for it. Maybe you can’t dance to it, but this has pretty much killed the gimmick of having two drummers for any other band to come. — AF

Mac Demarco — Arena

I arrive at the edge of the Arena tent, coffee in hand, tired from work, desperately needing a lie down. Not the best mood to dispassionately review a gig. The crowd is immense, and a good third of them looking like carbon copies of Mac himself, so no chance of seeing much. Mac and co take to the stage (or rather, as the noise from the crowd leads me to guess that they are coming on), look at each other goofily as they tune up. “Get comfortable,” Mac tells us, and at that I realize that it’s Friday, I’m drinking coffee, I’m at a festival, and things aren’t quite the disaster I’d made them out to be.

Mac DeMarco live Roskilde Felstival

No matter what you think of Demarco’s output, he has charm. He stands before thousands of people as easily he would be jamming in front of a few close friends. But although there are plenty of people gushing with enthusiasm for renditions of “Salad Days” and “The Stars Keep On Calling My Name”, the predominantly casual crowd drown things out a bit. This is painfully obvious during the David Syvian-esque down-tempo love song, “Another One”. Given that Demarco’s output can be a little on the samey-side, these keyboard-driven tracks become among the most interesting. But the chatter in the crowd starts to drown out everything. I suppose that’s the danger of being so laid-back. — CC

Colin Stetson and Sarah Neufeld — Gloria

Colin Stetson and Sarah Neufeld made names for themselves working with Arcade Fire and other indie darlings, but their work as solo artists does not approach those pop turns. It’s hard to even imagine the conversation that led them to decide that their instruments, bass saxophone and violin, were the two destined for a collaborative effort, but it’s for the best that they know better than we do.

Colin Stetson & Sarah Neufeld__MG_6592

Neufeld’s violin playing feels like a series of loops, reflected in her own songs as well as her collaboration with Stetson, and it’s this light thread that acts as a guide through their compositions. Stetson, by comparison, offers more range, from the thin and reedy to a gut rumbling frequency, as on their final song, the title track to their album, Never Were the Way She Was.

It’s not only their joint album they play. Stetson provides sax for one of Neufeld’s pieces and each of them trading off in performing their own songs while the other sitting quietly to the side, setting a relaxed example for the assembled crowd. It’s weirdly perfect music for a rainy afternoon that has people taking flight into the sheltered Gloria space. The only way it could be better is if there was room to get rid of the wet rain gear. — AF

Peaches — Apollo

A muddy field is not really the right venue for an encounter with Peaches. Her confrontational brand of eletro punk is more befitting of a grimy basement. Her cartoon amazon warrior outfit, graphic in its anatomic detail, more than befits the stomach-churning stabs of bass that issue out of the PA. It feels more like an extreme form of interrogation than a musical act, but you get the impression that’s exactly what she’s going for. — CC

peaches live roskilde festival

Tal National — Avalon

There are no two ways about it: it’s a bit of a dispiriting, wet day today. But over the years we have discovered a secret, albeit a fairly obvious one: when things are looking a bit down and dreary, go find a West African band. And Niger’s favourite band, Tal National, are precisely the people to save this rainy Friday evening.

Look, if you’re in the habit of reading several different Roskilde reviews, you are going to encounter a recurrent word in conjunction with Tal National: tight. Certainly a merited adjective, if not exactly the most descriptive. The core sextet (although reportedly the band can consist of upwards of thirteen musicians) are preternaturally in synch, weaving disparate rhythmic patterns together, stopping and starting without warning, keeping everyone on their toes. The audience, many of whom are in the Avalon tent mainly to shelter from the rain, take instantly to the skill and enthusiasm that is at the heart of this group.

tal national live roskilde festival

As they say themselves, Tal National are all about unity. Its members hail from every part of the country, come together to travel from town to town (while also holding down day jobs) spreading the music. One image from their set speaks volumes: the band’s defacto leader, Hamadal “Almeida” Moumine, picks up his bandmate’s drumsticks and shows them to the crowd. They are both splintered right through the center. “This happens every time, he is a very expensive drummer.” The man in question beams on, steam pouring off his bare shoulders. — CC

PHOTOS: Roskilde Festival 2016, Day 2

in Photos by

Photos by Tom Spray

Photo by Tom Spray

DSC_9423

DSC_9570

DSC_9434

DSC_9740

DSC_9846

DSC_9891

DSC_9972

DSC_0277

DSC_0188

Photos: Morten Aagaard Krogh (mortenkrogh.com)

Photo by Morten Aagard Krogh

Savages_DSC1686

Go to Top