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PHOTOS: Roskilde Festival 2015

in Photos by

Bob Hund

Photo by Morten Krogh
Photo by Morten Krogh

Communions

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Ratking

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Noel Gallagher

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

The War On Drugs

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Father John Misty

Father John Misty (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Morten Krogh

St Vincent

St. Vincent (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Morten Krogh

Foxygen

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Perfume Genius

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Lust For Youth

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Pallbearer

Pallbearer (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Morten Krogh

Hot Chip

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Ought

Ought (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Morten Krogh

Fat White Family

Fat White Family (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Morten Krogh

Pharmakon

Photo by Morten Krogh
Photo by Morten Krogh

The Tallest Man On Earth

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Run The Jewels

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Kendrick Lamar

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Goat

Goat (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Morten Krogh

Nils Frahm

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Deafheaven

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Paul McCartney

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Jamie xx

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Africa Express

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

PHOTOS: Roskilde Festival 2015 – Day 4

in Photos by

Joanna Gruesome

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Nils Frahm

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Deafheaven

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Paul McCartney

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Jamie xx

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Africa Express

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

PHOTOS: Roskilde Festival – Day 3

in Photos by
Run The Jewels (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)

The Tallest Man On Earth

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

 

Run The Jewels

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Run The Jewels (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Run The Jewels (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Kendrick Lamar

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Goat

Goat (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Goat (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Goat (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Goat (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Goat (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Goat (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Kate Tempest

Kate Tempest (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Kate Tempest (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Kate Tempest (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Kate Tempest (photo Morten Aagaard Krogh)

 

Roskilde Festival: Day 2

in Blog/Live Reviews by
St. Vincent (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Father John Misty (Avalon)

Being the drummer in Fleet Foxes might mean many things, but fun isn’t one that springs to mind. Yet Josh Tillman, performing as Father John Misty, is exactly that: fun. His last album, I Love You, Honeybear, a tongue-in-cheek folk melodrama of heartbreak and vacuity, has cemented his reputation as everyone’s favourite hipster troubadour. He is in fine form at Avalon, despite describing himself as looking like he’s “just crawled out of a coffin”: from bar-room ballads to hillbilly hip-shakers, he moves like a Confederate officer imitating Jarvis Cocker [the sun is frying my brain — ed]The title track has the whole crowd raucously joining in, but it is on the slow, acerbic numbers like “Nothing Good Ever Happens at the Goddamn Thirsty Crow” that Father John really shines. Turning air-quotes into a dance move might  just be the most annoyingly hipster thing one could do, but there is always an undercurrent of genuine anger or joy that elevates it from ironic posturing. — CC 

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

 

St Vincent (Arena)

When you can play guitar like Annie Clark and sing like Annie Clark, and have songs with the weird energy St. Vincent has, there aren’t too many more demands to make. So when she does a little shuffle around the stage that makes her look like she’s on a treadmill, or does choreographed dances with her keyboardist/guitarist, or comes out on stage on a stretcher, it’s like extra credit. Clark is a compelling performer and manages to attract attention to herself without a flashy stage show. The crowd moves in a blend of dancing and thrashing.

While projecting stories of the audience’s childhood about starting fires with magnifying glasses and making cardboard wings and jumping off houses in an attempt to fly, she holds her fist over her head like a revolutionary. In what is probably the most inspiring sight of the day, teenage girls emulate her — offsetting her other projection that everyone in the crowd was born before the 21-century. Sorry Annie, I’m pretty sure that’s the one thing you got wrong. — AF

St. Vincent (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
St. Vincent (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Perfume Genius (Pavilion)

Mike Hadreas wants to be a pop star. Sometimes. He’s in an in between phase of singer-songwriter at his piano and fuzzy synth-pop savant, which explains why his performance occupied an equally gray area. Listening to him play his quiet songs, they don’t lose any intimacy, which is a feat in itself. But you do wonder how he ended up playing a festival of this nature. Part of it is a failure of setting — he really would have benefited from an enclosed space like Gloria. But part of it is also not really knowing how to play to a festival crowd. “Queen,” his biggest single to date, is a brightly colored burst of energy that pulls an elated reaction from the crowd. Coming in at the hour mark of his set, it would have been a perfect way to end things. But he returns to the stage to round things out with more quiet, intimate songs. It’s lovely, but it belongs in a theatre. — AF

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Pharmakon (Gloria)

Dark, doom-leaden industrial artists make music with scary undertones, but it takes a special effort for them to match that feeling of ill will live. Pharmakon, however, is terrifying. She opens her set at Gloria by smashing what appears to be a rock against what appears to be a cookie tray with a mic taped to it. Visually, it’s a bit confusing, but it’s also loud as shit.

Unlike many electronic artists, Pharmakon doesn’t confine herself to the table behind her gear. She sets loops rolling and then stalks about with a mic in hand. There’s an agitation bordering on rage similar to a cage lion projecting from her, and when she jumps into the crowd, in the darkened space, there is a real feeling of being hunted. It is uneasy, and the noise is sometimes violent, but the only disappointment was that her set was so short. I’ll be eagerly awaiting her return to Denmark, but I also wouldn’t want to meet her in a dark alley. — AF

Pharmakon (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Pharmakon (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Ought (Pavilion)

On paper, Ought do not appear to be any different from most post-punk inspired indie bands. But on their debut LP, More Than Any Other Day, the band captured a freshness and energy that returns much needed vitality to the genre. In a live setting Ought is even better than on record, reveling in repetition and rhythmical nuance, buoyed along by frontman Tim Darcy’s Mark E. Smith-esque barks [I still say he sounds more like the Violent Femmes’ Gordon Gano — A]. “Pleasant Heart” jolts in and out of an erratic riff reminiscent of certain Tom Waits records, an instant classic of jerky dance song genre, and “Clarity!” lives up to the enthusiastic exclamation mark in its title. In a genre that often revels in confusing, it is exactly the quality of clarity that separates Ought from their peers. Matt May’s effected keyboards, plugged into a guitar amp, are responsible for this shiny, effortless tone that permeates the record, matched perfectly by a simple-but-spot-on rhythm section. — CC

Ought (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Ought (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Fat White Family (Pavilion)

Since the release of Champagne Holocaust  in 2013 there has been no band on earth I have wanted to see live more than the Family. Their performances are already semi-legendary in their confrontational excess, earning them the reputation as not the best, but the only rock band left on Earth [Muse’s last-bastion of arena rock performance earlier in the evening suggests that there are, in fact, other rock bands left on earth— A] Emerging out of a self-confessedly awful country band in South London, Fat White Family are a noxious cauldron of primitive garage rock, psychedelia and good ol’ weirdness. They scuttle onto the stage at Pavilion like characters out of an Alex Cox movie, part cowboy junkies, part homicidal hippies. Guitarist Saul Adamczewski seems to be missing even more of his front teeth, which of course only makes him grin and gurn with more enthusiasm, eagerly picking up half-smoked cigarettes thrown onto the stage. Frontman Lias Saoudi finally saunters in with a face like a restraining order, confirming that this evening the band are going to live up to expectations. As the band tear through “Autoneutron”, “Touch the Leather”, “I am Mark E. Smith”, both Lias and the crowd get more riled up, culminating in a series of stage dives and some minor genital manipulation. — CC

Fat White Family (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Fat White Family (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

SEE ALL THE PHOTOS HERE

PHOTOS: Roskilde Festival 2015 – Day 2

in Photos by

Father John Misty

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

 

Father John Misty (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Father John Misty (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Father John Misty (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Father John Misty (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Father John Misty (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Father John Misty (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

St. Vincent

St. Vincent (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
St. Vincent (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
St. Vincent (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
St. Vincent (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
St. Vincent (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
St. Vincent (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Foxygen

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Perfume Genius

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Lust For Youth

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Pallbearer

Pallbearer (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Pallbearer (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Pallbearer (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Pallbearer (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Hot Chip

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

 

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Ought

Ought (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Ought (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Ought (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Ought (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Fat White Family

Fat White Family (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Fat White Family (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

 

Fat White Family (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Fat White Family (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Pharmakon

Pharmakon (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Pharmakon (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Pharmakon (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Pharmakon (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

 

PHOTOS: Roskilde Festival 2015 – Day 1

in Photos by
Bob Hund - Roskilde Festival 2015

Photos by Morten Aagaard Krogh (mortenkrogh.com) and Tom Spray (tom-spray.com)

Bob Hund

Bob Hund - Roskilde Festival 2015
Photo by Morten Krogh
Roskilde Festival 2015 nikon-10
Photo by Morten Krogh

Communions

Roskilde Festival 2015 Communions
Photo by Morten Krogh
Communions (Photo by  Tom Spray)
Photo by Tom Spray
Communions (Photo by  Tom Spray)
Photo by Tom Spray

Off!

Off! Roskilde Festival 2015 (photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)
Photo by Morten Krogh
Roskilde Festival 2015 nikon
Photo by Morten Krogh
Roskilde Festival 2015 nikon-5
Photo by Morten Krogh

Ratking

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Noel Gallagher

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

Pharrell Williams

Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

The War On Drugs

Roskilde Festival 2015 nikon-18
Photo by Morten Krogh
Roskilde Festival 2015 War On Drugs (2)
Photo by Morten Krogh
Roskilde Festival 2015 nikon-23
Photo by Morten Krogh
Photo by Tom Spray
Photo by Tom Spray

The Entrepreneurs guide to Roskilde Festival

in Blog by
The Entrepreneurs at Roskilde Festival

This year’s Roskilde Festival is not a normal one for The Entrepreneurs, an upcoming trio from Copenhagen. They are playing no less than three shows at difference locations during the festival. We caught their blistering set at the Rising stage, and met up with them today to hear what concerts they are most looking forward to at Roskilde.

The Entrepreneurs
The Entrepreneurs live at Roskilde Festival 2015 (The Rising Stage)

Communions – Wednesday, 18.00 | Pavilion

We really like Communions. Coming out of the same scene as Iceage, there is something un-Danish about them, which we appreciate. It’s punk and love, at the same time.

Paul McCartney / Deafheaven – Wednesday, 18.00 | Pavilion

We saw Deafheaven when they played Beta 2300 in Copenhagen last year. It is an amazing band, and if it was not for Paul McCartney, that would be our concert of choice. But we have to see Paul McCartney, we are all fans of The Beatles, and some of McCartney’s songs like The Long Winding Road are among our favorites. Some of us even like what he did with Rihanna, but there is no consensus when it comes to that.

Africa Express, Saturday, 23.00  | Arena

It is simply a fantastic line-up, with artists like Warren Ellis, Damon Albarn and Bo, the guitarist from Mew – and we love Bo, you can write that, both his personality and the way he plays the guitar.

Father John Misty, Thursday, 17.00 | Avalon

He is a true performer, simple as that.

https://youtu.be/bmivOHrkREg

 

Roskilde 2015: Our Most Anticipated Acts

in Blog by

Roskilde 2015 is gearing up, and as half of the population of Copenhagen migrates towards the festival grounds, it’s time for us to share the acts we are most enthusiastically anticipating.

Wednesday

18:00 – Communions (Pavilion)

19:00 – Bob Hund (Avalon)

19:15 – Ratking (Apollo)

23:00 – The War On Drugs (Arena)

Thursday

17:00 – Father John Misty (Avalon)

18:00 – St Vincent (Arena)

20:00 – Perfume Genius (Pavilion)

23:00 – Pharmakon (Gloria)

00:00 – Ought (Pavilion)

02:00 – Fat White Family (Pavilion)

Friday

16:00 – The Tallest Man On Earth (Arena)

18:00 – Kate Tempest (Apollo)

19:30 – Kendrick Lamar (Orange)

20:00 – Einstürzende Neubauten (Avalon)

https://youtu.be/48nakpWpYTI

21:00 – Run The Jewels (Arena)

22:30 – Disclosure (Orange)

Saturday

15:00 – Girl Band (Pavilion)

17:00 – Joanna Gruesome (Pavilion)

20:30 – Chelsea Wolfe (Gloria)
che

22:30 – Deafheaven (Pavilion)

23.00 – Africa Express (Arena)

00:00 – Myrkur (Pavilion)

Festival report: Copenhell

in Live Reviews by
Copenhell crowd

Photos by Alexander Brandel. Text by Oliver Brandel

Placed at the old facilities of B&W. A Modern waste land in central Copenhagen. Just 50 meters

from the old metal foundry, we find Copenhell. The biggest metal/rock in Denmark( and probably

the only one worth mentioning.) The festival saw the day of light in 2010, and have now grown

quite big over the last 5 years.

Before arrival I heard that the tickets for thursday and friday was sold out. The expectations were

high. After entering the gate to Copenhell I was mildly disappointed. So much space, so few

guests. I stood in the food area, where every kitchen was given a cliché name, like “Hell Burger”

and “Devil’s Thai Corner”. From there I could spot all 3 scenes at the Copenhell. Helviti, Hades and

Pandæmonium. No music, just people walking around, laying down on the hill, that surrounds and

the area, and enjoying the sun, just like the rest of Copenhagen.

Gojira live at Copenhell
Gojira live at Copenhell

All in all, the surroundings didn’t really impress and I thought that this was going to be a very long

festival. Yeah sure, you had all the vital stuff a true metal festival needs. Viking land, pop-up tattoo

shop, patch shops, beers and pork barbecue. But all that couldn’t counter the the fact that it felt

deserted and some how half finished.

Suddenly, the warmth of a thousand suns (It felt that way) blasted through the area. Copenhell

used a very clever technique to tell the audience, that a new band was entering a stage. BIG A**

FIREBALLS. Now we were talking!

I was soon to realize the real nature of Copenhell.

The strength of the festival wasn’t this half-finished apocalyptic waste land. It was amazing bands,

amazing audience and an amazing vibe of love, not just for the music, but for all fellow metal

heads gathered at the end of world, or at least Copenhagen.

 

Solbrud live at Copenhell
Solbrud live at Copenhell

Solbrud

Solbrud went on stage and gave the audience what they asked for. Uncompromised black metal,

just as it should be. With the debut album “Jærtegn”, Solbrud really made something special. An

album that made all the critics bow down to the new heroes of black metal.

The frontman Ole Luk screamed like he was possessed by Satan himself. The quartet from

Denmark showed everybody why the hype was so big and very real. For the first time in my life, I

actually enjoyed black metal. An demonstration of brutal force and big talents.

Primus live at Copenhell
Primus live at Copenhell

Primus

Big mushrooms on the stage, funny smelling tobacco in the air. Primus was about to enter Helviti.

With Les Claypool in front, slapping the bass to pieces, Primus took us to their psychedelic world.

the cartoonish and wierd music that makes the band who they are, doesn’t really work at a venue

like this. Slow beats and a lot of funny noises didn’t make the crowd go crazy. They tried, they

really did. I don’t blame the band, I blame the bookers. It was not a bad concert at all, it just

seemed misplaced, especially when 80% of crowd only know the for their contribution to the South

Park intro.

Turbonegro live at Copenhell
Turbonegro live at Copenhell

Turbonegro

The Norwegian band Turbonegro is mostly known for their parody of rock n roll and Pride worthy

outfits. It was stupid and funny, just like you want Turbonegro to be. Who dosen’t love Hank von

Helvete, the chubby frontman in hot pants and face paint. They gave everything they had and the

audience enjoyed every second of the musical comedy on stage. Always funny to watch. If you

don’t like music, just bring your best earplugs and have a laugh!

Gojira

The best concert at Copenhell. Period. No one stood a chance. No friendly chit-chat with fans, no

funny comment, just pure evil death and technique. The French band Gojira dominated the stage

and spanked the ears of the audience. Hypnotizing death mixed with the sounds of djent makes a

perfect cocktail, just ask your bartender. Especially the L’Enfant Sauvage gives a perfect picture of

what modern death should sound like. There is nothing more to say. The came, they saw, the

conquered.

Crowd at Copenhell
Crowd at Copenhell
Marduk live at Roskilde Festival
Marduk live at Roskilde Festival

Marduk

Probably the most evil and satanic band on the bill this year. The devil frontman, Mortuus, screams

out “are you fucking with us tonight?!”. The responds was silence. People just stood there, liked

they were nailed to the pavement. I’ve got the feeling, that this concert was going to fall directly to

the ground. Sure it was last day and people were drunk and tired, but still, there was almost no

response for the 2/3 parts of the concert. At last! Marduk succeeded with getting the crowd going,

but it wasn’t enough to save the concert, although they play quite well.

Asking Alexandria live at Copenhell
Asking Alexandria live at Copenhell

Asking Alexandria

The pretty boys from Great Britain went on stage and first pit was filled with women, waiting for

their One Direction of metal. Mixing metal with electronic music from Sonar festival, is not best

combination, but the ladies didn’t care, because the band is cute. It was quite obvious to see, that

a lot of the crowd only bought their ticket to see AA, and didn’t come for the “real” metal. But what

can you say. Their music is catchy and the hardcore fans loved it. No great technique or lyrics, but

a hell of energy and presence. It was actually not as bad, as I would have thought.

The Darkness live at Copenhell
The Darkness live at Copenhell

The Darkness

Wasn’t this supposed to be a metal festival? Sure, all the people at Copenhell knows “I Belive In A

Thing Called Love” and can probably sing the most of it, but aren’t these guy like 60 years old by

now? It is clear from the get-go that this is going to be one hell of a tough crowd as the audience is

filled with conservative metal heads. But the guys from The Darkness actually did it! With their 70s

rock and roll attitude, funny performance and well mastered instrument, it was possible to conquer

the audience. They gave a good show, but it was possible to tell that the band was a bit road-worn

after the last 15 years. Especially when singer, Justin Hawkins, couldn’t hit his signature high

notes. Very funny, but not amazing.

 

SESSION: Cold Specks

in Sessions by
Cold Specks (Photo by Alexander Brandel)

“Born all in the dark wormy earth, cold specks of fire, evil, lights shining in the darkness.” These lines from James Joyce’s Ulysses would later inspire the stage name of Somali-Canadian singer-songwriter Ladan Hussein. Somehow you can hear her sound in these words; layered and complex, full of soul and beauty.

On a mild January morning, after playing a sold out show at Vega the night before, Cold Specks arrived at the Black Tornado to perform some songs from her second album, Neuroplasticity. Here is the atmospheric ‘Absisto’ and the soulful ‘Let Loose The Dogs’.

The session was recorded at the Black Tornado Studios. This is also where the portrait of Cold Specks by Alexander Brandel was taken.

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