Online music magazine based in Copenhagen, Denmark


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VIDEO: First Hate – “Holiday”

in Blog/New Music by

First Hate will be embarking on Roskilde Festival exactly a week today when they headline the Countdown stage on Monday 27th June, as a summer treat they’ve released new single “Holiday”. The track plus the video for the track was composed and directed while on the road in China earlier this spring. Speaking about the single, frontman Anton Falck Gansted had this to say about the process of writing and directing.

“I wrote the song and started producing it while we were riding on trains & airplanes across China. Driving through smog polluted valleys and endless forests of skyscrapers, it gave this odd impression of being in a parallel dystopic dimension somewhere in the future. The music was supposed to be the soundtrack of looking back to before the end of the world to times where mankind hadn’t already destroyed the planet. When we came back to Copenhagen and finished the track it ended up being about looking back at life and remembering the good times, times when you’re in a new relationship or for me just thinking back to the times when myself and Joakim first met and spent our first summer together.”

“This new track is kind of the warm up before we start recording our debut album, we did a lot of things differently this time, working with some good friends and talented people (Patrick Kociszewski & Bastian Emil) who recorded bass and drums for us. In the end it’s a holiday track and we’ve had to have fun making it.“

“The video is a bunch of homemade videos we shot while on our tour in China last month. Fused with some photo booth shots of me singing in front of the computer. It’s a way for us to be able to look back at these times and remember them once we’ve grown up.”

Live dates:
27.06.2016 – Roskilde Festival, Roskilde, DK
08.07.2016 – Le Point Ephemere, Paris, FR (Tickets)
09.07.2016 – SCP Festival, London, UK (Tickets)
21.07.2016 – Boomtown, Gent, BEL (Tickets)
12.08.2016 – Sodabar, San Diego, USA
13.08.2016 – Berserktown, LA, USA
15.08.2016 – Empty Bottle, Chicago, USA
17.08.2016 – Nothing Changes, New York, USA
14.09.2016 – The Waiting Room, London, UK
15.09.2016 – Wharf Chambers, Leeds, UK
16.09.2016 – The Lughole, Sheffield, UK
17.09.2016 – Jumpin Jacks, Newcastle, UK
29.09.2016 – Atlas, Aarhus, DK (Tickets)
30.09.2016 – Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, DK (Tickets)
05.11.2016 – Cønjuntø Vacíø Festival, Barcelona, ESP

Watch the video for “Holiday” below:


in Sessions by
Wangel - Photo: Lasse Dearman
Wangel, the musical collaboration between singer-songwriter Peter Wangel and producer Kasper Ejlerskov Leonhardt, began in 2013. Their debut single, ‘Seoul’, went straight into heavy rotation on Danish national radio P3 soon after. Last year Wangel performed on the Roskilde Festival’s Rising stage and recently Freedom, their first full length album, was released on Playground Music. Here Today invited Wangel to perform a couple of songs live at Black Tornado Studios. We are proud to present ‘Spinning Head’ and ‘You’ve Got To Say It Loud’ from Freedom.

Edited by Morten Aagaard Krogh (
Filmed by Morten Aagaard Krogh, Johan Ask Pape (, Tim Panduro and Johannes Leszinski.
Sound engineer: Troels Damgaard Holm
Mixed and mastered by: Kasper Leonhardt
Produced by Here Today



LIVE REVIEW: Marissa Nadler, Lille Vega, 08.06.2016

in Live Reviews by
Marissa Nadler live at Vega

We’ve all been to the half-full show where the artist on stage begs everyone to come a little closer to the stage. If they’re very engaging, people come forward; if they’re not, the audience stays where they are and everyone feels awkward.

Marissa Nadler does not play these games. Instead she walks on stage at Lille Vega alone, picks up her guitar, and begins playing “Drive.” The audience immediately gravitates towards her.

There’s an uncommon amount of competition for musicians that night. Marissa’s audience have elected to see her instead of Muse or the Melvins who both have sold out shows nearby. This small crowd is dedicated; one person even corrects her about what album “Dying Breed” is on. It’s not surprising that they’re attention is rapt, nor to see them gently swaying as she sings. Even if you’re a newcomer to Marissa’s music, something about it makes you feel peaceful.

Her solo songs, all played on a semi-hollow electric — no acoustics, no 12 strings — highlight her voice more. To listen to her in this setting is to hear her voice as a separate entity from everything else happening. It floats not only over the music but over everyone else in the room. It’s the very evocation of “haunting.”

After a few songs she brings out her band, two of whom are openers Wrekmeister Harmonies (and highly recommended for lovers of vaguely droning rock songs and rich vocal harmonies). This portion of her set focuses on her new album, Strangers, released last month. Marisa’s voice melts into these arrangements, with guitar and viola or electric piano ready to swallow it up. It feels like a departure, and it’s only a small part of her set, but she proves that she can bring the same depth as when she’s on her own.

After this interlude she’s solo again, and focusing on older songs, because, as she said of Strangers, “a lot of you don’t know it yet, right?” She ends her main set with a cover of “Tecumseh Valley” by Townes van Zandt — which in her hands sounds as much a part of her catalogue as her own songs — and plays Leonard Cohen’s “Famous Blue Raincoat” for her final song of the night because she “came all the way to Denmark for one show [and had] to make it worth it.” It was worth it.

If you don’t really know Strangers yet or missed out on Marissa, never fear, she’s got plans to return to Copenhagen this year. No matter what else is happening, you’ve no excuse to make other plans.

PHOTOS: Fat White Family, Loppen, 24.05.2016

in Photos by
Fat White Family

Photos: Morten Aagaard Krogh (

Fat White Family performing live at Loppen (photo: Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Fat White Family performing live at Loppen (photo: Morten Aagaard Krogh)

-2300HOFat White Family performing live at Loppen (photo: Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Fat White Family performing live at Loppen (photo: Morten Aagaard Krogh)

LIVE REVIEW: Kevin Morby, Jazzhouse, 10.05.2016

in Live Reviews by
kevin morby live in copenhagen

It’s not surprising that a musician who has released nine albums in seven years is an energetic guy. Kevin Morby, once of Woods and the Babies, tells the sold out crowd at Jazzhouse that he had a long drive from Berlin and only slept half an hour the previous night, but that doesn’t stop him from spending most of his set bouncing on his toes and shaking his curly hair back and forth. The main room is very hot, but while his backing band condescend to roll up their sleeves, Morby is committed to his gray suit and seems unencumbered by his sartorial choices.

Morby primarily plays songs from his latest album, Singing Saw, familiar enough to the audience now for “Dorothy” to be greeted with cheers from the opening chords. He treats the audience to a track written since the album, which bears resemblance to the more energetic songs on Singing Saw, as well as older songs such as the title track from his solo debut, Harlem River.

Jazzhouse is the perfect setting in terms of acoustics for Morby and his band. And his band is truly special. The grouping of two guitars, bass, and drums mean that some of the trimmings from the albums are stripped back. Where there were string arrangements or keyboards, now it’s just guitars doing their best impersonations, which brings out the bluesy aspects of the songs. The bass is very present but never intrusive, clear without registering a thud in your intestines. Morby’s guitarist and backing vocalist is very understated in her performance, drawing little attention to her fancy fretwork. By contrast, his drummer looks like he’s going to burst apart every time the tempo picks up. And it’s more apparent live than in his recordings how much Morby’s songs rely on these shifts; the subtlety of the album is a jolt of energy live. And while his band emphasizes this, it’s clear when Morby plays “Black Flowers” solo that he is capable of relating the same effect on his own.

A lot of that ability to relate in his music come from the ease Morby projects on stage. He is comfortable with his audience and even a little goofy, at one point requesting the house lights be brought up so he can take photos. It’s easy to reconcile that man with the man who bounces around the stage. It’s easy to get wrapped up in the whole package.

LIVE REVIEW: Sarah Neufeld, Loppen, 08.05.2016

in Live Reviews by
sarah neufeld live in copenhagen

Expectations are high for any solo violinist. When the stage she appears on is Loppen, there’s some dissonance between the instrument and the setting. Sarah Neufeld showed, however, that the musician herself was in exactly the right place.

The Arcade Fire violinist’s songs hint at a Celtic, traditional influence, but her arrangements are adventurous and abstract. This becomes clear when she’s joined by her drummer, whose nuanced and creative playing transports Neufeld’s songs beyond their atmospheric recordings to something unexpectedly energetic and intense. At times, he comes close to upstaging Neufeld and her circular song structures with samplers, shakers taped to drum sticks, and subtle electronic inflections.

The energy stands in complete contrast to the fact that a large chunk of the small audience remains seated for the whole of the performance. In absence of seats, many people directly on the floor in good view of the stage. But this audience, however small, knows Neufeld and her work and is held rapt by her performance. Noise travels very easily in Loppen, and the vibe would have been incredibly different if the audience hadn’t been completely silent, if the more muted notes were muffled by talking, if fingers tapping on a snare couldn’t be heard.

But the energy is in Neufeld’s style of performing itself, which is obviously influenced by years of being in a band versus an orchestra. She never stands still and often swings her legs around when she moves. There is strength and muscle to in her playing, regardless of how rapid and slight her movements.

The standout movement of the evening was an extended pizzicato solo that swept Neufeld away as much as any guitar solo could have. But again it was her accompanist that rooted the song in something too abstract to be rock’n’roll, and so much more divine because of it.

LIVE REVIEW: PAWS, Stengade, 06.05.2016

in Live Reviews by
paws live at stengade copenhagen

Glaswegian trio PAWS are a no nonsense, no frills indie rock band. They play crunchy songs with catchy hooks, and they’re the kind of band that’s buzzy in their native UK. But so far they’re flying under the radar in Copenhagen, and their show at Stengade marks only their second visit to Denmark.

Amidst the fuzz of their existing catalogue, PAWS introduce their new single, “No Grace,” the recording of which is produced by Mark Hoppus. Perhaps it’s just the mention of his name, but the song instantly takes on a Blink-182 vibe that the other tracks don’t have. This is magnified as their vocals live have less reverb than on their recordings. Their new album is out next month, so it will be interesting to see how much of an influence the pop punk frontman has had on their sound.

To give them credit, PAWS had the unenviable position of following a band of locals whose fans/friends came out in droves but did not stick around. This could explain why, amongst their generally pleasant chatter, the band ask repeatedly if the audience are dead or alive — it does eventually produce the results of getting a small group to dance in front of the stage.

And they give back what they ask for. PAWS’s bass player, in particular, doesn’t hold still for a second, and bops across the stage and back again, throws himself forward and back in spasming motions, and somehow doesn’t break a sweat. And that’s really what you’re looking for from bands like PAWS; yes, there are plenty of other indie rock bands with solid tunes out there, but when you can get swept up in their energy, it feels unique and special every time.

LIVE REVIEW: Morton Subotnick, Jazzhouse, 21.04.2016

in Live Reviews by
Morton Subotnick

It’s safe to say that we never anticipated the audience rushing the stage of an 83-year-old electronic artist’s performance, but Morton Subotnick has always been a man of firsts. The electronic music pioneer played selections spanning his landmark albums Silver Apples of the Moon and A Sky of Cloudless Sulphur at Jazzhouse in low-key, minimalist style.

Minimalist in terms of presentation, that is — in terms of gear, Subotnick has enough hard drives in his set up to run a major ticket-buying operation and enough wires to be a legitimate fire hazard. But otherwise he sits behind a table, brightly lit but with no projections (though it takes at least 15 minutes before we register this point), the flashiest thing perhaps being his neon sneakers.

This is one of those rare occasions where you could conceivably hold a conversation over most of the music, yet no one is. The sounds come in whispers and the odd wave of noise, but mostly maintain a serene, therapeutic level. These are not note-perfect representations of the albums, either, which in many ways comes as a relief. Working with laptops instead of primitive synthesizers, it’s far more exciting to hear the music reinterpreted with modern technology than to hear a facsimile of what it was. From a technical perspective, this means that the higher end, for example, is far less harsh sounding, which is a favor to anyone with tinnitus if nothing else.

Morton Subotnick

This modernization doesn’t take away from the intent of the original works, though. It is still clear that Subotnick’s work is unlike what we have come to know electronic music to be. Even contemporaries like Kraftwerk who embraced the machine aspect of electronic music still don’t have the Space Age quality of Subotnick’s work. It’s choppier, more robotic, and brings to mind the proto-electronic work of tape splicers like Delia Derbyshire more than any New Waver. To underscore this, and the evolution of his own compositions, Subotnick ended the evening with a newer piece that fits more comfortably with contemporary abstract electronic works than much of his catalogue.

After his set, Subotnick came out to take away his gear, but didn’t get far. People were already on stage, looking at the labyrinth of wires, and immediately cornered him into conversation. More people followed suit, filling Jazzhouse’s small stage. Maybe the fresh news of the loss of yet another music legend had made people more brazen, and the artist took it in good humor. It proves that the fascination with his weird sounds is as real now as it was nearly 50 years ago.

PHOTOS: A Place To Bury Strangers, Loppen, 10.04.2016

in Photos by
A Place To Bury Strangers performing at Loppen in Copenhagen

Photos By Morten Aagaard Krogh (

A Place To Bury Strangers performing at Loppen in Copenhagen

A Place To Bury Strangers performing at Loppen in Copenhagen

A Place To Bury Strangers performing at Loppen in Copenhagen

A Place To Bury Strangers performing at Loppen in Copenhagen

A Place To Bury Strangers performing at Loppen in Copenhagen

A Place To Bury Strangers performing at Loppen in Copenhagen

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