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VIDEO: First Hate – “Holiday”

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First Hate will be embarking on Roskilde Festival exactly a week today when they headline the Countdown stage on Monday 27th June, as a summer treat they’ve released new single “Holiday”. The track plus the video for the track was composed and directed while on the road in China earlier this spring. Speaking about the single, frontman Anton Falck Gansted had this to say about the process of writing and directing.

“I wrote the song and started producing it while we were riding on trains & airplanes across China. Driving through smog polluted valleys and endless forests of skyscrapers, it gave this odd impression of being in a parallel dystopic dimension somewhere in the future. The music was supposed to be the soundtrack of looking back to before the end of the world to times where mankind hadn’t already destroyed the planet. When we came back to Copenhagen and finished the track it ended up being about looking back at life and remembering the good times, times when you’re in a new relationship or for me just thinking back to the times when myself and Joakim first met and spent our first summer together.”

“This new track is kind of the warm up before we start recording our debut album, we did a lot of things differently this time, working with some good friends and talented people (Patrick Kociszewski & Bastian Emil) who recorded bass and drums for us. In the end it’s a holiday track and we’ve had to have fun making it.“

“The video is a bunch of homemade videos we shot while on our tour in China last month. Fused with some photo booth shots of me singing in front of the computer. It’s a way for us to be able to look back at these times and remember them once we’ve grown up.”

Live dates:
27.06.2016 – Roskilde Festival, Roskilde, DK
08.07.2016 – Le Point Ephemere, Paris, FR (Tickets)
09.07.2016 – SCP Festival, London, UK (Tickets)
21.07.2016 – Boomtown, Gent, BEL (Tickets)
12.08.2016 – Sodabar, San Diego, USA
13.08.2016 – Berserktown, LA, USA
15.08.2016 – Empty Bottle, Chicago, USA
17.08.2016 – Nothing Changes, New York, USA
14.09.2016 – The Waiting Room, London, UK
15.09.2016 – Wharf Chambers, Leeds, UK
16.09.2016 – The Lughole, Sheffield, UK
17.09.2016 – Jumpin Jacks, Newcastle, UK
29.09.2016 – Atlas, Aarhus, DK (Tickets)
30.09.2016 – Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, DK (Tickets)
05.11.2016 – Cønjuntø Vacíø Festival, Barcelona, ESP

Watch the video for “Holiday” below:

LIVE REVIEW: The KVB + The Foreign Resort, Loppen, 26.05.2016

in Live Reviews by
KVB

Thursday, Loppen was set to get cloaked in black with The KVB and the local support of The Foreign Resort. As it turns out, what was supposed to get us into the mood for the UK duo’s reverb-washed minimal electronics was none other than new wave romanticism. Altough The Foreign Resort’s music nominally inhabits the similar dark realms as that of The KVB, they did seem like a somewhat odd choice for an opener.

After getting over the initial impression of the band as another bunch of cheesy 80s revivalists, we actually found a lot to enjoy in their emotional take on the shoegazey post-punk. While they do seem to have picked up a few tricks from their US tour mates A Place to Bury Strangers, The Foreign Resort are not here just to make noise and light up the strobo. Underneath all the fuzz lie some really catchy new wave hits and epic goth-tinged gems. It probably helps that the lead singer’s vocals recall Robert Smith on one hand and 90s emo-ish indie rock on the other.
The thing is, The Foreign Resort have something that’s unfortunately quite rare with contemporary shoegaze bands: proper songs. It might sound funny but it’s true – a good deal of new generation shoegazers rely heavily on effects, so much so they often forget that putting a shitload of reverb on a third-rate punk song doesn’t make you entitled to use My Bloody Valentine in your press release. Ultimately, good songs are what saves a band that wears their 80s and 90s influences on their sleeve from being just a retro gimmick, as The Foreign Resort seem to know very well.

Following the noise and affectionate singing came The KVB with their repetitive drum machine rhythms and Nicholas Wood’s monotone delivery. Not that this is a bad thing in itself – after all, that’s precisely what they’ve made a name for. Judging by their recent releases, however, they didn’t get very far from 2013’s Immaterial Visions, still a highlight in their discography. Whoever is into a band like The KVB knows – and probably loves – the disinterested aura of a typical darkwave post-punk act. However, their live performance unfortunately brings forward The KVB’s inferiority to both the indifference of contemporaries like Tropic of Cancer and HTRK and the pastiche of acts like Nite Fields or The Soft Moon.
The majority of their set floated by dispassionately lulling the audience into… well, not caring too much about what’s going on on stage. It wasn’t until the end of the concert that we got to hear gems like “Dayzed” which got us into the band in the first place. That, of course, wouldn’t be an issue at all if their recent material could match the early singles. Their latest album Of Desire seems to be more-of-the-same, and the same could be said for pretty much every song played live the other night.
For some inexplicable reason, The KVB chose “Sympathy for the Devil” as one of the closing tracks. Their cover of the Rolling Stones’ classic is just one of those covers that doesn’t make much sense even though it does shine a light an interesting source of inspiration for a darkwave band. The rock source seems to be covertly but thoroughly present in their riffs and often psychedelic approach, however the song in question is simply too powerful for their bland delivery. After a few more interesting tracks, this proved to be an unfortunately convenient conclusion to The KVB’s performance.

Lust for Youth “Compassion” Release Party, Sigurdsgade, 02.04.16

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Although primarily conceived and promoted as a release party for Lust for Youth’s new album Compassion, the event that took place at Sigurdsgade on Saturday was much more than what could have easily been a headliner concert with support acts thrown in to fill the lineup. Actually, as the evening wore on, the most important performance casually turned into the least memorable one. But let’s start at the beginning.

The “Ny Dansk Romantik” duo Rosen & Spyddet had the ever-unrewarding task of opening another band’s big night. Fortunately they were wise enough to regard this as an opportunity – and promptly took it! It’s probably safe to assume that a good deal of the early-bird audience was not acquainted with their work, and (as always) some preferred to chat at the bar rather than to engage with music. But all those who cared to listen quickly found themselves enchanted by the duo’s soothing melodies. Rosen & Spyddet presented the recently released Drengen Ved Brystet as well as material from their beautiful 2015 album Fortuna, using warm synths and gentle beats to create a dreamy atmosphere moving you to a different place and time.

While setting up their gear, members of Orphan Ann brought some flowers to arrange on the floor. The Morrisey-invoking gesture couldn’t have been more misleading though, as the flowers were soon overshadowed by chains. Unlike the lush ambience from the romantics playing before them, lulling the audience into daydream is about the last thing Orphan Ann wanted to do. Their brief but intense performance amped up the volume and increased the ferocity of what many expected to be a benign synth-pop event. Those of us who don’t mind a little disruption and/or challenge found plenty to appreciate in the Swedish duo’s blend of concert and performance art driven by harsh electronics, rallying cries and narration in Russian.

After two gorgeous and demanding performances, it was easy to forget the reason why most people came in the first place. As the venue started to fill up, it seemed like the intimate underground gathering was over and all of a sudden it was time to party. Having previously shared the bill and/or label with the opening acts, Lust for Youth have clearly had a hand in the lineup selection. The decision to have what is very much an experimental band performing before their polished synth-pop, as well as the music they make with their solo projects, makes it impossible to write Lust for Youth off as some incidentally talented poseurs – no matter how much they sometimes tried to go for precisely that image.

It is debatable whether an album release party is intended for the band and their friends to simply have fun, or if it’s supposed to be the band’s night to shine, and the experience of Lust for Youth’s Saturday concert would probably depend on your view on this. Having seen them perform elsewhere, I know this was far from the best they can do, and surely they know it too. Considering the technical issues that marked the entire first part of their performance, it’s somewhat understandable that things didn’t run smoothly and that the band was visibly annoyed. However, while Fischer and Rahbek made sure that the music continued properly blasting regardless of the issues, Norrvide seemed as if he couldn’t be bothered to sing, turning his usual fittingly deadpan delivery into careless shouts and sneers.

Sure, Lust for Youth’s anthemic synth-pop hooks still sound powerful over the PA, but on this particular occasion, it was kind of difficult to care. They should nonetheless get praise for putting together such a daring lineup, and for providing two amazing acts with a chance to gain some new fans.

 

DFI Musikfilm Festival 2016: Our Picks

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Copenhagen’s Cinemateket is back with another edition of Musikfilm Festival, a film festival dedicated to music documentaries, rockumenatries, gigumentaries and more neologisms we can’t be bothered to come up with right now. It’s a chance to see what goes on behind the scenes of the music world, as well as a celluloid window into some of the most mythical concerts of the last half century. Behold, our picks for the coming week:

Daft Punk Unchained (Saturday, 16:30)

The festival opens with the (free!) showing of Daft Punk’s odyssey from the brash kings of ‘French touch’ to the robot-headed, disco overlords of today. Expect lots of teasing about “the men behind the masks”, hordes of celebrities quite rightly, if self-servingly, gushing over them, and the burgeoning realization that Homework is still the best thing they ever did. CC.

Sing Me the Songs That Say I Love You: A Concert for Kate McGarrigle (Sunday, 17:30)

Kate McGarrigle’s death in 2010 was a major loss for folk music, and the musical family she left behind. Her children, Martha and Rufus Wainwright, have McGarrigle’s influence written all over their careers (sorry Loudon), which they drive home with this tribute concert from 2011. Brace yourself for added emotional intensity from personal photographs and anecdotes, and because no one does emotional intensity quite like the Wainwright/McGarrigle family. AF.

Industrial Soundtrack for the Urban Decay (Tuesday, 21:30)

It’s all in the name, really. If you’re into brutalist architecture, the clanging of metal, and that peculiarly British sense of liberation through grimness, this is the film for you. Starting with industrial legends like Throbbing Gristle and Cabaret Voltaire, the film looks at the influences and influence of the genre that bridged the gap between pop music, avant-garde art and post-modern theory. CC.

Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars (Tuesday, 21:45 and Sunday, 19:15)

If you’re still feeling sad about Bowie, you can find one of a million rips of Cracked Actor on YouTube, or you can sit in on one of these screenings with a room full of other people sharing your feelings. This classic 1973 concert film is young Bowie in all of his technicolor splendor and still offers the right amount of weird more than 40 years later. We’re not saying we’ll cry during “Rock ‘n’ Roll Suicide,” but we’d appreciate it if you’d avert your eyes. AF.

The Possibilities Are Endless (Wednesday, 19:00)

Edwyn Collins is the former Orange Juice frontman, Postcard Records founder, and the guy behind “A Girl Like You,” which his been licensed a million times. His role as respected indie stalwart was nearly destroyed after a brain hemorrhage left him paralyzed down his right side and only able to say “yes,” “no,” his wife’s name, and “the possibilities are endless.” Yet Edwyn is still writing and recording music today, and this is the story of how. AF.

Mavis! (Thursday, 19:15)

Mavis Staples is surely one of the perfect subjects for a documentary film: a lifetime of music, civil-rights activism, and a never-ending string of collaborations with the great and the good in American music (her latest album includes songs written for her by Nick Cave, Neko Case and Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon). Take a gander and find out just why everyone wants to work with Mavis, and why Bob Dylan wanted to marry her. CC.

Hot Sugar’s Cold World (Thursday, 21:15)

After splitting up with his girlfriend, field-recording musician Hot Sugar goes hunting for new sounds in Paris. It sounds more like a Tao Lin novel than a music documentary, but if you didn’t convulse with rage while reading Taipei you can probably take this too. But I will admit that this film first sparked my interest because I was not expecting to read the names of both Jim Jarmusch and Neil deGrasse Tyson in the blurb. CC.

The Amazing Nina Simone (Friday, 19:15)

Look, the forthcoming Nina Simone biopic is a trash fire that’s already started smoldering. Forget it exists and look instead to this  semi-authorized documentary about Simone’s incredible work as a jazz singer, a protest singer, and a civil rights activist. It won’t downplay the controversy the music or the person; Simone was a complex character of the sort Americans could take inspiration from in an election year. Let’s not let that be upstaged by a controversial casting decision. AF.

LIVE REVIEW: Puce Mary Album Release, Mayhem, 30.03.2016

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It seems only fair that an artist’s album release show should be her night to shine. Puce Mary, celebrating the release of her album The Spiral, on a bill of solid noise artists (performing in ascending order of aggression) doesn’t shine so much as burn; she is a one woman inferno who  consumes any impression the evening’s previous performers might have made.

Mayhem is dimly lit, a smoke machine is activated multiple times during sets, making it impossible to see or breathe, and for the occasion there are bunches of dried or at least wilting flowers tactfully arranged everywhere. It’s about as atmospheric as Mayhem ever gets, and while a single person behind a table of gadgets doesn’t, on paper, sound like it will be visually stimulating, it’s a shame when it’s blotted out by a Steven King-style fog.

The strengths of Puce Mary’s work is that she’s more rhythm centric than a lot of noise artists and her sound has a greater range of dynamics. She maintains a steady, brutal low end that, when it takes over a song, is bone-crushing. When she allows harsher punctuations to balance it, the shrieking could wake the dead.

Her physical movements while she plays are somewhere between being carried away by her songs and being completely possessed by demonic tones — it seems like a risk to climb on a table where all of your gear is laid out, but then it’s nice to have the visual threat level upped to match the music.

Half an hour into the set, the music cuts off abruptly. The already dim house lights don’t come up, but the DJ cues up some charmingly incongruous calypso. A small group can be seen huddling over Puce Mary’s gear. Whether or not that was the intended ending, it worked.

But seriously, the ventilation at Mayhem is not good enough for that much smoke.

LIVE REVIEW: Laibach, DR Koncerthuset, 16.01.2016

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Laibach (photo by Johannes Leszinski)

Photos by Johannes Leszinski

It’s hard to know what to expect of a Laibach show, even halfway through a Laibach show. Despite over 30 years as a band, they are a group whose reputation has surpassed their work and music, who are synonymous with fascist satire and singer Milan Fras’s strange headwear. Their performance at DR Koncerthuset was more minimalist than expected, and grandiose because of the pageantry managed with such a barebones set up.

Laibach photo by Johannes Leszinski

The focus of the drama is obviously Fras and his voice that sounds more than anything akin to Tuvan throat singing, especially when contrasted so extremely with Mina Špiler’s soprano. It’s in their movements: standing stock still when not singing, holding out their arms when they are singing like church choir directors, or the drummer crashing cymbals together with huge flourishes.

The first half is sweeping, slightly spacey ambient electronic, splintered by the vocal pairing. It’s unexpected when it’s interrupted by a fifteen-minute intermission that leads to, in the words of their pre-recorded voice over, something completely different. Let’s hand this over to John Oliver for a moment:

And he did.

It was an overstatement to bill the night as “Laibach play The Sound of Music,” as the posters did, when this was limited to four songs. And it was a little predictable that they were all arranged as Špiler accompanied by a piano before synth, drums, and Fras joining in (with the exception of “My Favorite Things,” which Fras sang alone while the items he describes in the song flashed on the screen behind him in the most consumerist manner possible).

But then things shift back from this strange diversion — as it really can only be thought of, whether or not it was what was advertised — to Laibach’s own work. Though a song like “the Whistleblowers” could fit in just as easily as a weird showtune (in the context of what we’ve just seen), there’s still the feeling that we’ve shifted to somewhere else yet again. Not ambient, not militaristic, not overtly satirical, and the most fascinating part is, if this kept going all evening, surely the tone would continue to change.

Laibach photo by Johannes Leszinski

After the encore, and before people can quite get through the studio doors, the John Oliver clip flashes up on the screen. It’s intercut with the band presumably in North Korea, and the suggestion that maybe their trip didn’t go especially well. But we’ll find out soon; the documentary will be out later this year.

The Entrepreneurs guide to Roskilde Festival

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The Entrepreneurs at Roskilde Festival

This year’s Roskilde Festival is not a normal one for The Entrepreneurs, an upcoming trio from Copenhagen. They are playing no less than three shows at difference locations during the festival. We caught their blistering set at the Rising stage, and met up with them today to hear what concerts they are most looking forward to at Roskilde.

The Entrepreneurs
The Entrepreneurs live at Roskilde Festival 2015 (The Rising Stage)

Communions – Wednesday, 18.00 | Pavilion

We really like Communions. Coming out of the same scene as Iceage, there is something un-Danish about them, which we appreciate. It’s punk and love, at the same time.

Paul McCartney / Deafheaven – Wednesday, 18.00 | Pavilion

We saw Deafheaven when they played Beta 2300 in Copenhagen last year. It is an amazing band, and if it was not for Paul McCartney, that would be our concert of choice. But we have to see Paul McCartney, we are all fans of The Beatles, and some of McCartney’s songs like The Long Winding Road are among our favorites. Some of us even like what he did with Rihanna, but there is no consensus when it comes to that.

Africa Express, Saturday, 23.00  | Arena

It is simply a fantastic line-up, with artists like Warren Ellis, Damon Albarn and Bo, the guitarist from Mew – and we love Bo, you can write that, both his personality and the way he plays the guitar.

Father John Misty, Thursday, 17.00 | Avalon

He is a true performer, simple as that.

https://youtu.be/bmivOHrkREg

 

LIVE REVIEW: Jenny Hval, Jazzhouse, 24.06.2015

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Jenny Hval live at Jazzhouse, Copenhagen 2015

Whenever artists make an off-kilter record, it’s always exciting and a little nerve-wracking to see how they will perform it. In the case of Jenny Hval, whose latest album, Apocalypse, Girl, combines spoken word with muted electronics and some odd-ball pop songs, there are any number of ways her performance at Jazzhouse could go wrong.

The show, however, is far beyond a concert and more along the lines of performance art. It’s pure entertainment, the kind you recommend and don’t worry about whether or not other people will find it strange. [inlinetweet prefix=”null” tweeter=”null” suffix=”via @heretodaydk”]You’d have to be completely joyless not to find humor in Hval’s avant garde fly girls[/inlinetweet], who play with an iPad that projects onto a screen on stage, or gyrate in the shadows of a backlit screen, or momentarily take over to sing a karaoke version of Britney Spears’ “I’m Not a Girl.”

Hval herself angles for subtler performance, wearing a reddish wig for no apparent reason, allowing herself to be jostled by the fly girls, and pausing slightly longer during “Kingsize” when she declares “I am one-fourth Danish,” to allow the crowd to cheer (which they do).

Jenny_Hval-9765

Hval never seems to exert herself when she sings; no matter how far she stretches her voice or her range, her body is languid, lax, her posture somewhat lazy. She balances this nicely with projections of a woman smoking, sped up just enough to make it twitchy whereas Hval is anything but.

The visual aspect of the set is a tremendous counter to the fact that the music side of the performance doesn’t differ at all from the recordings. But you could never argue that you haven’t been given a real treat. For how casual the evening feels, it’s clearly choreographed down to the wigs being pulled off at the end of “The Battle is Over.” Hval has to apologize to the crowd that there won’t be an encore, that they haven’t prepared one. And after the spectacle of the last hour, it’s better that she walks away than offers anything less.

 

Sónar Festival Day 1, Koncerthuset, 13.03.2015

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Sónar’s inaugural Copenhagen festival, cushioned within different spaces at DR Koncerthuset, ironically covers a lot of ground. There is the broad spectrum of electronica represented, from pop music to dance friendly synths to industrial to the somewhat frightening. But then there is also the balance to strike in atmosphere between festival and club night, unsure of whether it wants to be bright and shiny or evoke a warehouse feel. Where Sónar succeeds is in allowing everyone to physically move from room to room and adapt accordingly.

— Words by Amanda Farah and Alex Maenchen

Smerz — 19:30

There are two hard surfaces prominently at play as Sonar Festival kicks off its two-day residency in DR Koncerthuset: Metal and glass. Opening the program on the intimate SonarDome stage, the Norwegian duo Smerz embody the venue’s stark concrete staircases with their uncompromising brand of electronic pop. It feels like a deliberate choice to play on the basement level because here everything hits you heads up. Henriette Motzfeldt and Catharina Stoltenberg’s compositions are measured, two-part exercises in breakbeat that mix the sublime with the violent. The machine Smerz builds from it is one Stoltenberg operates with deft percussive gearshifts, throwing up gang signs like its a FUBU convention, while Motzfeldt feeds it with her porcelain vocals and melodic keys. They’re definitely tougher than they look and almost as tough as they sound—sometimes they rip it so hard that it seems like wheels are going to fall off, but then you hear the tires squeal so slow they grind. —AM

Puce Mary — 20:00

What’s most jarring about Puce Mary is the beautiful, serene expression fixed on her face even as horror movie screams of feedback rise up around her. The only time that beatific expression changes is when she sings, holding the mic close to her mouth in her fists and producing guttural, inhuman sounds. She spends her set bowing something that doesn’t appear to be a stringed instrument and eking out rhythms from pulsing industrial noise and series of stutters and clangs. Add to that the soft colored lights swirling around the room and it’s like going to prom in the third circle of Hell. —AF

Sekuoia — 20:25

Sekuoia takes the stage and won’t let you forget it. Behind him the LCD screen shows the name plastered in tall, static white letters superimposed on scenes of blue and white skies, blue and white mountains, blue and white islands in the ocean. And that’s what the proceedings feel like: static and white, and sometimes blue. Sekuoia may be the stage name of 21-year-old electro ventriloquist Patrick Alexander Bech Madsen, but considerable credit should be given to the mercenary work by his accompanying guitarist and drummer, who both look clean out of a Dorito-encrumbed sofa cushion variety Red Hot Chili Peppers cover band. While Mr. Madsen takes a swig of water mid-song, the facade of live performance is held somewhat intact by his band. It doesn’t help matters that these songs seem build proof, never committing to a thought long enough to let the non-dancers in the crowd enjoy it too. These kids should be watchmakers, you can set time to these beats. But some flourishes make the stage show entertaining, and this goes for the drummer especially, who at times looks to sprout second and third heads where his shoulders are. In Sekuoia’s world of stacked samples and resonant dins, the clash of a real high hat goes a long way. When technical issues bring the show to an anticlimactic end, it becomes clear that the music is just a blue color swatch, cut so square and flat that the most interesting thing about it is the funny name behind it: Sekuoia. —AM

Darkness Falls — 20:45

The Danish trio makes for a convincing, non-specifically 80s tribute band right down to their costumes: Their singer is wearing an amazing sequined dress with severely jutting shoulder pads that look like they could cause harm. Their performance paints them as a band with potential to be a really great pop band some day. Their programming is pretty slick — which is good, because there’s more programming than anything else despite the presence of keyboards, guitar, and drums — their energy is good even if their movements are a little awkward, and they have a cohesive direction. And based on the way their final song is received, they have at least a few hometown fans ready to go crazy over them. —AF

Vessel
Vessel

Metronomy — 22:00

Perhaps what fans find most charming about Metronomy is their unabashed approach to heartfelt indie pop, and with a frontman in Joseph Mount who seems the kind to shyly shrug when asked whether he’s got any plans on prom night, it’s difficult to think it’s all some sort of coy affectation. Whatever doubts a middling appreciation for their studio recordings may conjure, Metronomy are for real. On the big SonarClub stage, they get right to the point with “Love Letters,” a song which could run on an endless loop on a channel devoted to unrealized iPod commercials. Percussions are particularly emphasized in keeping with their dancier numbers, working to push the other instruments forward rather than snuff them out. It’s a simple but smart bit of audio engineering that has the rest of the band all jazzing hands and gesturing toward drummer Anna Prior before Gbenga Adelekan’s bass plunks in on “The Look.” Metronomy’s music is given dimension on the stage that it just doesn’t have at home, in spite of whatever high end DJ rig you may play them through. “Resevoir” bleeps and bloops while Prior and keyboardist Oscar Cash do a go-go jig, and “Corinne” is a go-nowhere song that highlights precisely what’s working for this group—an infectious conviction to hit the notes, no matter how dull they are, as square and precisely as possible that you could very well take them home to meet your mother and go out for a raucous jig on the dance floor afterwards. —AM

Kenton Slash Demon — 23:15

The Kenton Slash Demon set feels like a welcome recalibration of mood. Big beats veiled in thick synths—like a good lover, they take their time. This is a DJ set through and through, but you’re in it. Everything is prudently mixed so as to give generous room for the listener to sink into the pulse of the track. Their builds are like suspension cables pulling taut. Even the out-of-place looking lady who caught the tambourine during the Metronomy set can’t resist joining in. The bar setup ensures that beer flows one way, into the thick of the crowd, and where it isn’t flowing in, it’s keeping those not having any fun stuck to the floor. The guys on stage are all smiles as they pull onto the familiar gravel of their own driveway—big beats and emotional high notes. They fade out in a mist of reverb before they pop the clutch for one more go. —AM

Vessel — 23:35

There is something inherently violent about Vessel’s music. His set opens with searing, painful static that, when it settles into something that by comparison could only be called gentler, it’s still thick, sludgy, and metallic. It’s also so beat-heavy that people are dancing in as thrashy a way as one can before they’re technically moshing. Behind Vessels is a series of distressing film projections — even the overly sexual ones imply distress — that are mesmerizingly well synched. So mesmerizing that I failed to notice at what point he had taken off his shirt, and really, the flailing, sweaty man behind the table would have been pretty compelling on his own. —AF

Jon Hopkins — 00:30

For a man with a slight frame, Jon Hopkin’s got clout. It seems only he can open a set with extended, elliptical whirring, like the orchestral track’s been ripped from it spine and skull, and still have the crowd visibly excited for what’s coming. The images on the screen behind him are like a minimalist film, primitive graphics interspersed with hi-def photography of particles from deep space, be it that of a night sky or a fathomless ocean. Point is, he’s sending our world spinning in a surge of fragments. His beats are incisive and sharp and dampened with sonar pings of strings. Hopkins is best when he’s building these polygonal sound structures, these open marriages of percussion and synths. About twenty minutes in there appears to be technical difficulties, with the video going black. Three minutes pass as things are furiously rewired. A heartbeat. High hat. Snare. We’re back and Hopkins is more animated than ever, a mad ship’s captain whose way of fixing what’s broke is breaking it some more. One thing was always certain—he’s was never going to let us drift. —AM

PLAYLIST: Here Today’s Concerts

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The month of March will not only be treating us with some exciting concerts, but also Sonar Festival (March 13-14). We have updated our “Here Today Concerts” playlist with a few selected artists that you might want to spend a night listening to. Among them are Dean Blunt, Jessica Pratt, Yung (tonight with Total Heels), Ex Hex and Wounded Kings.

Yung + Total Heels (Stengade, 04.03.2015)

As the music scene centered around Mayhem is becoming more widely known, you might be fooled into thinking that it is the only place to go underground in Denmark. That is not the case, though, as Aarhus has it’s own very lively scene. Yung is one of the most promising bands that have emerged from there in the last few years. Tonight (March 4. 2015) they will be playing Stengade along with another great band: Total Heels. Didn’t make it to any of Iceage’s sold out shows at Jazzhouse last week? Well don’t worry, good times are waiting at Stengade. [Link to event.]

Ex Hex (Loppen, 05.03.2015)

According to The Guardian’s 5 star review of Ex Hex’s 2014 album, Rips, the band “sit somewhere near the middle of a Go-gos/Ramones/Sleater-Kinney Venn diagram, and join latterday power-pop aces like Warm Soda, the Love Triangle and Sheer Mag in making some of the most endlessly repeat-listenable should-be-hits of recent years.”

What else is there to say, sounds fun, right? [Link to event.]

Dean Blunt (Jazzhouse, 20.03.2015)

Dean Blunt, who plays Jazzhouse on the 20th of March, is an interesting new breed of experimental lo-fi R&B, dub and electronica. Last year he released the album Black Metal to great critical acclaim.

Dean Blunt is also one half of Hype Williams. [Link to event.]

Jessica Pratt (Stengade, 28.03.2015)

San Fransisco born singer-songwriter Jessica Pratt has just released her second album, On Your Own Love Again. Forget laptop wall-of-sound productions, Jessica Pratt made her album on an analogue 4-track recorder with little more than a guitar and her voice. As Pitchfork writes, it worked out really well: “Its warm, home-recorded atmosphere is more dramatic and distinctive than Jessica Pratt [her debut album]: finger-picked psychedelia, lucidly layered harmonies, hissy tape effects, an overcast haze. But Pratt’s songwriting is more cohesive and concise, her whispered secrets more alluring”. [Link to event.]

Wounded Kings (Loppen, 18.03.2015)

Life can not always be expressed in freak-folk and “repeat-listenable should-be-hits”. Sometimes you need a bit of doom metal and this is where The Wounded Kings enter the scene. Their latest album Consolamentum has received great praise among reviewers. If you sometimes find yourself nodding along to Black Sabbath, Wounded Kings are worth considering. [Link to event]

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