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Our Top 20 Albums of 2015

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Every December the staff of Here Today meet to decide our favourite albums of the year. It’s an ugly brawl, with scars lasting well into the next Spring. This year, to save ourselves a bit of dignity, we thought we’d ask our readers to pick the best of our 20 candidates for best album. The voting will end at midnight on the 20th of December, but we will be arguing the case for each album until the final day.

[yop_poll id=”2″ tr_id=””” show_results=”-1″]

Majical Cloudz – Are You Alone?

When relationships end, it can get ugly fast. Some people lash out, and some turn it inwards. The source of heartbreak on Majical Cloudz’s Are You Alone matter far less than the overarching contemplation of what it means to be in love or alone. The down tempo album of pianos, synths, and solo vocals on this particularly lovelorn album makes it your best friend and companion for rainy days or just days when you can’t bear to face the world. And it’s still got more dignity to it than a Netflix marathon.

Protomartyr – The Agent Intellect

Protomartyr had all the makings of the next garage rock band of the minute, but there are already enough swampy vocals out there. What there isn’t enough of is the deadpan delivery that makes this band instantly recognizable. It’s as if that voice has given them license to go ever so slightly off the rails; with atypical narratives and atypical song structures, The Agent Intellect wraps its frayed ends around you and grips tightly. All the proof you need is in the second movement of “Why Does It Shake?” If that doesn’t make it a contender for song of the year, there’s no hope for any of us.

Jamie xx – In Colour

It seems ridiculous that In Colour is actually Jamie xx’s debut album as a solo artist. After two LPs with the xx, producing Gil Scott Heron’s I’m New Here, and countless remixes, finally we have a full-length album with Jamie’s name on the cover. Not that he is alone: xx bandmates Romy Croft and Oliver Sim make an appearance, as well as Young Thug and Popcaan. The result is a bright collection of down-tempo dance tunes with a nostalgic bent.

Viet Cong – Viet Cong

The Canadian quartet’s self-titled album is a soundtrack through a dystopian fairyland (and with song titles like “Pointless Experience,” “Bunker Buster,” and “Death,” that’s not really projecting). Pulled between ambient synths and math rock guitars, pulsed by deceptively understated drums,Viet Cong falls into loops that you could easily roll through for hours at a time without wanting to break out of the cycle. You’ll snap out of it, though, when the faux nice-guy vocals kick in and remind you that these guys have a fatalist streak in them. It’s definitely one of the most exciting debut albums of the year.

Chelsea Wolfe – Abyss

It’s been exciting to watch Chelsea Wolfe develop as an artist, and even more still to see how she’s harnessed the competing elements of her music in new ways. Abyss is her most balanced record yet, allowing her voice to float through quieter arrangements instead of always serving as a contrast to the intensity and harshness of the noise she works with. Songs liked “Grey Matter” hit that sweet spot of letting her voice shine over the aggression instead of in spite of it, but never let us worry for a second. Wolfe can make even the ugliest noises sound beautiful.

Sufjan Stevens  – Carrie & Lowell

Where other albums this year have distinguished themselves in their inventive production, Sufjan Steven’s seventh studio album takes the opposite approach: the instrumentation is limited, often nothing more than a finger-picked guitar, and effects are kept to a minimum. What we are left with is the deep melancholy of Stevens’ soft vocals, and his lyrics of loss. As a counterpoint to this close focus on the singer-songwriter’s emotional state, there is a limpid precision to his playing that cuts through the whole record, elevating it from naked confession to finely-wrought statement.

Panda Bear – Panda Bear Meets The Grim Reaper

Noah Lennox, co-founder of Animal Collective, returned with an album that showcases his signature blend of electronic pop and off-kilter psychedelia. It’s all there: the weird tropicana, angelic Brian Wilson voice, the bouncy synths. Noise and melody intertwine until they are indistinguishable from each other, lyrics melt into chorus-laden chants. Some critics have complained that none of this is particularly new with Panda Bear, but when the results are this good, it seems like a rather minor complaint.

Mbongwana Star – From Kinshasa

From Kinshasa to the Moon: this is the trajectory declared by the Congolese 7-piece at the beginning of their debut album. The record label may have neglected to append the destination to the album title, but the rest of the world hasn’t. It’s an often-bewildering journey, full of unfamiliar pulsating rhythms and dark bass lines, that don’t conform to what we would comfortably like to call ‘afro-beat’. Acoustic elements clash with lo-fi synths, the synchopated drums countered by the regularity of the electronic beats. It’s the sound of a big, busy, alien city moving into the future: crowded, idiosyncratic, chaotic and heady.

Father John Misty – I Love You, Honeybear

Some of us refused to believe that a member of Fleet Floxes could have a sense of humour. But say what you like about I Love You, Honeybear, it is not an album that takes itself very seriously. Josh Tillman has produced an album of nostalgic bar-ballads and folk love-hate songs suffused with bright colour and a sly wit. Perhaps what has captured the imagination of so many listeners is this odd juxtaposition between, on the one hand, Tillman’s emotional delivery and sentimental arrangements, and on the other, his withering treatment of millennial culture. It might be ridiculously mean-spirited, but if Bob Dylan’s “Idiot Wind” is anything to go by, most people are down with you insulting your former girlfriends as long as you do so in such an obvious way that it ends up biting your own ass.

Tobias Jesso Jr – Goon

Father John Misty was not the only one this year to make waves with some retro singer-songwriter nostalgia. But Tobias Jess Jr is less barroom depressive, more of a grand piano melancholic. Double-tracked vocals, minimal instrumentation, and heartfelt lyrics: it’s probably not a stretch to guess that plenty of weddings in 2016 are going to feature “Without You” on their playlist.

Kendrick Lamar – To Pimp A Butterfly

West-coast rap’s rising star exploded this year with To Pimp A Butterfly. Grandiose yet subtle, rooted yet avant-garde, the album is the perfect distillation of the best of both the old guard (Dre, Snoop, George Clinton, Ronald Isley) and the new (Thundercat, Flying Lotus, Rapsody). Full of the smoothest grooves and catchiest beats, the real strength of the album is how even the smallest details contribute to creating a vibrant, exciting whole. There is a moment at the end of “Wesley’s Theory”—when what sounds like a phone vibrating turns out to be the saxophone intro to the wild jazz of “For Free”— that perfectly sums up the level of creativity, humour and dedication that has had critics call this the definitive rap album of the decade.

Joanna Newsom – Divers

A new record from Joanna Newsom should always be considered a notable event. But if Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp A Butterfly can be considered a defining part of 2015, to say the same of Divers would feel faintly ridiculous. Divers is as much part of 1715 and 2215 as it is of this year. And that is what makes Newsom such a unique, fearless voice, one that can dedicate itself to the research of how humans work through and against time without even a hint of pretension. And an album whose first single opens with these lines is worthy of every accolade: “The cause is Ozymandian / the map of Sapokanikan / is sanded and bevelled / the land lone and levelled / by some unrecorded and powerful hand.”

Dick Diver – Melbourne, Florida

Sometimes what makes an album stand out is the reception it gets when you play it to other people. This year Dick Diver’s Melbourne, Florida stood out for this very reason. The sound is instantly familiar, songs distantly remembered from a past life, worming themselves back into your working memory. Those more familiar with the Aussie quartet will point out that the band have already made a name for themselves with their first three albums, but I can personally testify that everyone I’ve introduced to “Waste the Alphabet” and “Tearing the Posters Down” already has these engraved in their minds alongside the best that 80s and 90s indie pop ever produced. And don’t be fooled into taking this as twee: with song titles like “Beat Me Up (Talk To a Counsellor)”, there is a dark, caustic wit to Dick Diver that makes them worth anyone’s time.

Julia Holter – Have You In My Wilderness

After dazzling us with the dark, swirling chaos of Loud City Song in 2013, Julia Holter’s follow up, Have You In My Wilderness, presents itself as something of a return to the light. Gone are the dark horns and paranoid bass, replaced by harpsichord and dreamy strings. But don’t be fooled, there is still plenty of dark weirdness in Holter’s lyrics and vocal delivery. It’s just that they have been transferred into the bright, white room shown in the cover art. Opening with “Feel You” the closest thing to a pop-song Holter has ever produced, Have You In My Wilderness demonstrates a new, luxuriant side to an artist that will always be a part of Here Today’s personal pantheon.

Holly Herndon – Platform

If there’s an album that would be ridiculous to listen to in any analogue format, it’s Holly Herndon’s Platform. This collection of glitchy digital compositions captures the often-overlooked joys and perils of living through computers. Herndon has taken the Knife’s school of heavily-effected vocals to new extremes, sounding more like a computer that is trying to reconstruct music from a broken hard-drive. If that sounds a little off-putting, one can only respond that this is the whole point, but that is not to say that songs like “Chorus” and “Morning Sun” aren’t almost danceable. It’s just that they re-create what it’s like to listen to dance music on headphones, whilst browsing the internet: fractured, distracted, introverted. And it’s about time that we focused on the way that most of us listen to music day to day.

Blur – The Magic Whip

Since their reunion in 2009, Blur have peeked their heads around the corner every so often with a tour and a new single to make their existence more than a nostalgia trip. The Magic Whip, however, is the first real evidence that there is intention left in them. They’re a band whose members have gone in different directions in the last 10 years and brought those experiences back with them, but remember what it is everyone loves about them. Crunchy, abstract guitar solos? Check. Moody broody ballads? Check. Big, joyful singalong choruses? Check. Any memory of Britpop? Successfully traded for the here and now. Rather than argue that this is the best album of their career, it’s more apt to appreciate that this is exactly the record you would hope they would make now.

Jenny Hval – Apocalypse, Girl

It’s taken five albums, but with Apocalypse, Girl Jenny Hval has finally found a way to skip down the weird/accessible line with just the right balance. The Norwegian singer (who is one fourth Danish) got us all grooving to references to breast cancer and soft dicks, sneaking in feminist and anti-capitalist declarations with admirable wit. Her avant garde pop is a patchwork of electronic music, chilled beats, spoken word and gentle vocals. And yeah, you do feel a little dirty singing along to some of it (most of it?), but a huge part of Hval’s appeal is that she never forgets that the most effectively subversive music is, at its heart, fun.

Various Artists – Remembering Mountains: Unheard Songs by Karen Dalton

Karen Dalton was a literally unsung hero of the New York folk scene in the 60s. She released a couple of albums of covers, but was too affected by anxiety to keep recording, and never shared any of the songs she wrote herself. Fast forward to 20 years after her death and her songs are seeing the light of day, albeit through the interpretations of other artists. While Sharon Van Etten had chords for the title track, other artists had only lyrics to work with, making this album a collection of songs by artists like Julia Holter, Marissa Nadler, Isobel Campbell, and Josphine Foster, with lyrics by Dalton. The lineup alone should make Remembering Mountains an overlooked gem, but the thread of Dalton’s work tying the songs together makes it truly special.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BBNZIKlMpw

New Order – Music Complete

New Order have existed under that name in various incarnations for 35 years, but they still hold a place as the quintessential party band for the types of kids who don’t get invited to a lot of parties. Music Complete will definitely get you dancing, and the loss of Peter Hook means that there’s something really genuine in the laments of broken relationships (and with such a distinctive style, Hook is actually pretty easy to copy). Plus the guest appearances from Iggy Pop, La Roux, and Brandon Flowers also bring in unique sinister vocals, over the top pop shine, and a kind of meta-New Order interpretation respectively.

Courtney Barnett – Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit

Courtney Barnett is one of those artists that you really feel you could be friends with. She has no trouble relating the mundane in life with a dry delivery and a sense of humor that holds your interest. On Sometimes, she’s learned to use that voice to convey a deeper sense of ennui, as on “Depreston” and even hint at unexpected emotions other than boredom in “Dead Fox” before amping things back up with “No One Really Cares If  You Don’t Go to the Party.” And that’s really why Courtney Barnett could be our pal; she’ll tell crazy stories and entertain a full room, but probably spend the next two weeks hiding at home. We can get behind that.

PLAYLIST: Here Today Listening

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We are debuting “Here Today Listening“, a weekly-updated playlist for which we pick out the 7 tracks from recently released or upcoming albums that we have been obsessing over the most. Follow us on Spotify and stay updated on the best tracks of the week.

Father John Misty – “Nothing Good Ever Happens at the Goddamn Thirsty Crow”

The second studio album from Father John Misty, the moniker of Baltimore-born singer-songwriter and former Fleet Foxes drummer Joshua Tillman, has received high praise from critics around the world. Witty songwriting and lush melodies are at the center of this album. Lilting sadly like a barroom ballad, “Nothing Good Ever Happens at the Goddamn Thirsty Crow” shifts from lapsteel guitar to strings, and even a jazzy clarinet solo. But when it comes to Father John Misty, it’s all about the cynical one-liners: “She blackens pages like a Russian romantic/ Gets down more often than a blowup doll.”

Darren Hayman – “May Day 1894”

Darren Hayman, formerly of the band Hefner, is no stranger to history concept albums. In the summer of 2013 Hayman released Bugbears, the last album in his trilogy about 17th century Essex. Two years later he is back with a new concept album that rewrites an old arts & crafts pamphlet by nineteenth-century polymath William Morris. The result, Chants for Socialists, is collection of beautifully crafted songs that are as relevant now as they where more than hundred years ago.

Marika Hackman – “Animal Fear”

In the music press you are more likely to hear about Marika Hackman’s privileged background and famous model friends than her music, but the London-based singer-songwriter lush and down-tempo take on alt-folk doesn’t need any such context. Her latest single, taken from her debut album, We Slept At Last, balances laid-back vocals with ponderous drums, poised like a cat ready to spring.

Blur – “Go Out”

We still have two months to way before the release of The Magic Whip, Blur’s first album in 12 years. Judging by “Go Out”, the supposed “Asian” theme of the album is thankfully limited to artwork and lyrics, rather than the cultural insensitivity of Siouxsie and the Banshees “Hong Kong Garden”. The single features a cheeky bass-line, care of Alex “the smug cheese man” James, noisy guitars from Graham Coxton, and Damon Albarn singing about onanism “at the local.”

The Pop Group – “Mad Truth”

The comeback of the year aware has to go to The Pop Group, not just for the length of time between album releases (35 years), but also for the power of this belated punch to the face. Citizen Zombie might be a little more accessible than their 1979 debut, Y, but the same manic energy is apparent. “Mad Truth” is a gorgeous piece of violent disco funk, proving frontman Mark Stewart has lost none of his confrontational attitude.

Courtney Barnett – “Pedestrian at Best”

The Australian singer-songwriter came to critical attention with the release of her double EP in 2013, full of laid-back Americana-influenced jangle. “Pedestrian at Best” substitutes that slacker image with grungy riffs and a witty barrage of lyrics (“I think you’re a joke but I don’t find you very funny”). It’s a promising taster of her upcoming album, Sometimes I Sit and Think, and Sometimes I Just Sit, due at the end of March.

Screaming Females – “Ripe”

Speaking of grunge, New Jersey’s Screaming Females are back with the scorching Rose Mountain. Thanks to the production of Mat Bayles, the band’s sixth studio album has a decidedly stoner-rock flavour, full of chugging bass-lines and fat guitar tones. Marissa Paternoster’s vocals punch through the noise, adding a brilliant demented edge to the already manic tones of songs like “Ripe”.

 

Photos of the year 2013

in Blog/Photos by

The Hives

The Hives, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 31.01.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The_Men-9

The Men, Stengade, Copenhagen, 21.03.2013 (Photo by Morten Krogh)

The Soft Moon, Loppen, Copenhagen, 30.03.2013 (Photo by Morten Krogh)

Shout Out Louds, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 09.04.2013 (Photo by Hilmar Darri Flygenring)

Folkeklubben-3581

Folkeklubben, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 25.04.2013 (Photo by Morten Krogh)

Autre Ne Veut

Autre Ne Veut, Rust, Copenhagen, 23.04.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Daughter

Daughter, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 10.04.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids

Japandroids, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 03.04.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Jake Bugg

Jake Bugg, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 02.04.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Palma Violets

Palma Violets, BETA, Copenhagen, 31.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Schultz and Forever

Schultz and Forever, DR Byen, Copenhagen, 03.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Araab Muzik

Araab Muzik, KB3, Copenhagen, 08.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metz

Metz, Ideal Bar, Copenhagen, 04.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Crystal Castles

Crystal Castles, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 02.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Cody

Cody, Store Vega, 01.03.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Widowspeak

Widowspeak, Loppen, Copenhagen, 08.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 10.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

The Eclectic Moniker, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 10.05.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Øresundsfestival 2013

Broke, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 11.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

MØ, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 11.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

Iceage, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 11.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Øresundsfestival 2013

The White Album, Øresundsfestival, Malmö, 11.05.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen, Parken, Copenhagen, 14.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Bring Me The Horizon

Bring Me The Horizon, Amager Bio, Copenhagen, 18.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Beach Fossils

Beach Fossils, Stengade, Copenhagen, 21.05.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Nick Cave

Nick Cave, Optimus Primavera Sound, Porto, 31.05.2013 (Photo by Janye Yong)

blur

Blur, Optimus Primavera Sound, Porto, 31.05.2013 (Photo by Janye Yong)

grizzly bear

Grizzly Bear, Optimus Primavera Sound, Porto, 01.06.2013 (Photo by Janye Yong)

A$AP Rocky (Photo by Tom Spray)

A$AP Rocky, Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, 11.06.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Mew (Photo by Tom Spray)

Mew, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 12.06.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The National (Photo by Tom Spray)

The National, Loppen, Copenhagen, 20.06.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Trash Talk (Photo by Tom Spray)

Trash Talk, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 27.06.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Drenge (Photo by Tom Spray)

Drenge, Roskilde Festival, 04.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Savages (Photo by Tom Spray)

Savages, Roskilde Festival, 04.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Slipknot (Photo by Tom Spray)

Slipknot crowd, Roskilde Festival, 04.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Animal Collective (Photo by Tom Spray)

Animal Collective, Roskilde Festival, 04.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metz (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metz, Roskilde Festival, 05.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

EL-P (Photo by Tom Spray)

EL-P, Roskilde Festival, 05.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Iceage (Photo by Tom Spray)

Iceage, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013

Action Bronson (Photo by Tom Spray)

Action Bronson, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The National (Photo by Tom Spray)

The National, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metallica (Photo by Tom Spray)

Metallica, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Sigur Ros (Photo by Tom Spray)

Sigur Ros, Roskilde Festival, 06.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

James Blake (Photo by Tom Spray)

James Blake, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (Photo by Tom Spray)

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Queens Of The Stone Age (Photo by Tom Spray)

Queens Of The Stone Age, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kraftwerk (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kraftwerk, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kraftwerk (Photo by Tom Spray)

Kraftwerk crowd, Roskilde Festival, 07.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

John Legend (Photo by Tom Spray)

John Legend, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 16.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Sleep Party People (Photo by Tom Spray)

Sleep Party People, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 27.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Smashing Pumpkins Photos by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

The Smashing Pumpkins, Falconer Salen, 31.07.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

OFF Festival

OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

AlunaGeorge, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

AlunaGeorge, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Cloud Nothing, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Cloud Nothings, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Scenes, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Julia Holter, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Julia Holter, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Walkmen, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Walkmen, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Autre Ne Veut, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Autre Ne Veut, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids crowd, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

We draw A, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

We draw A, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Fucked Up, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Fucked Up, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

My Bloody Valentine, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

My Bloody Valentine, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids, OFF Festival (Photo by Tom Spray)

Japandroids, OFF Festival, Katowice, Poland (Photo by Tom Spray)

Godspeed You! Black Emperor Photos by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Godspeed You! Black Emperor, Tivoli Concert Hall, Copenhagen, 07.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

ice_cream_cathedral-8479

Ice Cream Cathedral, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 07.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Haim

Haim, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 07.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Tame Impala - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Tame Impala, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 09.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Dirty Beaches - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Dirty Beaches, Copenhagen, 11.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Mikal Cronin - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Mikal Cronin, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 11.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Ducktails - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Ducktails, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 11.08.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

transmetro-9211

Trans Metro Express, Strøm Festival, 13.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

haxan cloak

The Haxan Cloak, Cisternerne, Copenhagen, 14.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

malmo-festival-9366

Ice Cream Cathedral, Malmo Festival, Road Trip, 17.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

malmo-9862

Baby In Vain, Malmo Festival, Road Trip, 17.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

byrne-vincent-9963

David Byrne & St Vincent, Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, 22.08.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

MS MR Live 1

MS MR, Rust, Copenhagen, 28.08.2013 (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Matthew E. White (Photo by Jen Tse)

Matthew E. White, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 09.09.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

APlaceToBuryStrangers-2063

A Place To Bury Strangers, Loppen, Copenhagen, 24.09.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

Delorean (Photo by Jen Tse)

Delorean, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 25.09.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

Editors (Photo by Tom Spray)

Editors, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 26.09.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

MGMT (Photo by Jen Tse)

MGMT, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 01.10.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

James Blake (Photo by James Hjertholm)

James Blake crowd, Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, 06.10.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Baby In Vain (Photo by Jen Tse)

Baby In Vain, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 04.10.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

Washed Out - Photo by Tom Spray (www.tom-spray.com)

Washed Out, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 09.10.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Foals (Photo by Tom Spray)

Foals, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 15.10.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Julianna Barwick (Photo by Tom Spray)

Julianna Barwick, Jazzhouse, Copenhagen, 20.10.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Biffy Clyro by Jen Tse

Biffy Clyro, Den Grå Hal, Copenhagen, 01.11.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

national 1

The National, Forum, Copenhagen, 02.11.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

JuliaHolter-5362

Julia Holter, Jazzhouse, Copenhagen, 05.11.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

IMG_6180small

Nick Cave and The Bad Seeds, Falconer Salen, Copenhagen, 08.11.2013 (Photo by Jonas Bang)

14. okt 13 80_o

The Woken Trees, UK tour (Photo by Jonas Bang)

Crystal Stilts-7055

Crystal Stilts, Stengade, Copenhagen, 14.11.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

fuckbuttonsmulti

Fuck Buttons, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 16.11.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Volcano Choir (Photo by Tom Spray)

Volcano Choir, Amager Bio, Copenhagen, 18.11.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Youth Lagoon (Photo by Jen Tse)

Youth Lagoon, Pumpehuset, Copenhagen, 20.11.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

EL-P and Killer Mike (Photo by Tom Spray)

EL-P and Killer Mike, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 20.11.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Tallest Man On Earth (Photo by Tom Spray)

The Tallest Man On Earth, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 21.11.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

Get Your Gun (Photo by Jonas Bang)

Get Your Gun, Russia/Estonia tour, fall 2013 (Photo by Jonas Bang)

Trentemøller (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Trentemøller, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 22.11.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

blouse-8593

Blouse, Loppen, Copenhagen, 26.11.2013 (Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh)

MØ (Photo by James Hjertholm)

MØ, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 28.11.2013 (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Queens Of The Stone Age (Photo Jen Tse)

Queens Of The Stone Age, Forum, Copenhagen, 29.11.2013 (Photo by Jen Tse)

Destroyer (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Destroyer, Jazzhouse, Copenhagen, 03.12.2013 (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Kurt Vile (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Kurt Vile, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 05.12.2013 (Photo by Ivan Boll)

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Oh Land, Store Vega, Copenhagen, 12.12.2013 (Photo by Ivan Boll)

Cut Copy (Photo by Tom Spray)

Cut Copy, Lille Vega, Copenhagen, 13.12.2013 (Photo by Tom Spray)

ARTICLE: Who will headline Roskilde Festival 2014?

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Its almost like talking about Christmas on December 26th but still people are starting to speculate to who will be headlining Roskilde Festival 2014 which is set to take place between 28th June to 6th July. Although its early in the day certain patterns emerge with festivals and heres our list as to who we think is likely to grace the hallowed Orange Stage in 2014.

Arcade Fire

Why?: Three flawless albums and another just around the corner with the release of their forth studio album Reflektor on October 29th. They’re set to go on a worldwide tour in support of Reflektor starting off down under at Big Day Out Festival, come summer they’ll hit the shores of Europe expecting to play some of the largest festivals this fine continent has to offer, what other festival is bigger in Scandinavia than Roskilde Festival?

Last played the festival: 2007 (The year of the flood)

Likelihood of them appearing: Highly

Trentemøller

Why?: Roskilde always try give a diverse mixture of Danish and International headliners and across the rest of the bill for that matter. Hes about to release new album Lost September 23rd. Trentemøller has already announced shows across Europe and North America with his popularity only growing since his last headline show of Roskilde in 2009.

Last played the festival: 2009

Likelihood of them appearing: Almost certain

Rage Against The Machine

Why?: Roskilde’s organisers are friendly people and each year they ask who the public want to see play their festival, each year RATM top that list (or somewhere close), we appreciate that they’re a tough band to book since they only play shows when it suits them. Next July will mark 3 years since they last played live together, however, theres every chance 2014 could be that year with them strongly rumoured to play LA Rising in August, Roskilde and a string of other festival dates in the summer of 2014 could be a nice warm up.

Last played the festival: 1996

Likelihood of them appearing: Slim, but theres every hope

Daft Punk

Why?: After dropping Random Access Memory this year we all expected them to play at least a few festival slots with strong rumours of them appearing at Primavera Sound, Glastonbury and even Roskilde. This unfortunately never happened. And while appearances from them have been minimal this year they made a short appearance at the MTV VMA’s last week and this could work as a snowball effect to have them announce concerts and festivals “around the world” next year.

Last played the festival: 1997

Likelihood of them appearing: Doubtful

Jay-Z or Kanye West (or both together)

Why?: The always active Brooklyn/Chicago rappers both have recently released their own albums Magna Carta Holy Grail/Yeezus (respectively) this year, common trend with these two is that they hit the European circuit a year or so after dropping an album. However both have just had their first children, this could deter them, however they’re entrepreneurs and know the value of touring.

Last played the festival: 2008/2009

Likelihood of them appearing: Fairly good

Eminem

Why?: He just played Reading/Leeds festivals last weekend and he’s about to release Marshall Mathers LP 2, I’m sure he’ll want to play a handful of European shows in support of the album. He’s isn’t as relevant as he was back in 1999 and sure he’s cleaned up his act, but he’s still got a back catalogue of hits worthy of any festival.

Last played the festival: Never

Likelihood of them appearing: Miracles can happen

Mew

Why?: They’re about to release their forth album and again another Danish band worthy of being a headliner. Although what goes against them is that they played Orange stage back in 2012, that wasn’t so long ago but they surely can’t miss out on booking them again.

Last played the festival: 2012

Likelihood of them appearing: Likely….but…..

Blur

Why?: With rumours of new material and them playing most other large festivals across Europe in recent years, 2014 could be the year they make it back to Roskilde Festival, after all Damon Albarn has a long lasting relationship with the festival having played recently with Gorillaz and three times previously with Blur. They performed at SmukFest in 2012 and this year could finally be the year they roll out the hits once more to a 60,000 strong crowd rejoicing to epic sing-a-longs to one of Brit pops finest bands.

Last played the festival: 2003

Likelihood of them appearing: Good chance

Vampire Weekend

Why?: Its sometimes hard to constitute who a headliner is at Roskilde, although they most likely won’t be billed as a headliner theres a good chance if they book Vampire Weekend they’ll make an appearance on the Orange Stage in a similar slot to what The National played at this years festival. The band released their third album Modern Vampires Of The City earlier this year to critical acclaim, their first two albums secured them headlining spots at several high profile festivals across the globe and have now proved themselves worthy headliners. What better music to hear on a Saturday evening as the sun is setting over the Orange Stage than Vampire Weekend?

Last played the festival: 2010

Likelihood of them appearing: High

Wu-Tang Clan

Why?: The Staten Island rap collective played many high profile festivals worldwide this year including their set at Vangaard Festival in Copenhagen. That hyped set has left fans purring for more and will most likely be one of the top 5 bands the fans vote to headline the festival in 2014, after all it will mark 10 years since they last played Roskilde!

Last played the festival: 2004

Likelihood of them appearing: High!

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