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Roskilde Festival 2014: Friday 4th July

in Live Reviews by

Photo by Tom Spray

Connan Mockasin

I can’t watch Connan Mockasin without thinking, ‘this guy is creepy as fuck’. Maybe it’s the haircut, or the glasses, or the weird pyjama waistcoat combo, or that smile, but I’m pretty sure it’s mostly because I keep having flashbacks to his video for ‘I’m The Man, That Will Find You’, where he stalks a woman around her house and then when they meet it’s all very uncomfortable, like a 70s soft porn. And although the Pavillion doesn’t have quite the same soft lighting scheme, it’s still an awkward experience to watch him. But at moments, I set my awareness of rape culture to one side, and appreciate the brilliant pop-psychedelia of Connan Mockasin’s echoing, twang guitar and overly vocoded falsetto over the bass on the track, and it’s suddenly a far more pleasureable watch. But it’s also massively repetitive, and combined with the unspeakably hot weather outside the tent, gives everyone a pounding headache. Connan Mockasin manages to compel the audience with his seductive tones, but wholly engaging them is a different prospect.

HT

Connan Mockasin (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Warpaint

Warpaint are cooler than you will ever be. With baggy t-shirts, pink hair and hotpants, they look like the poster girls for the Coachella look, which combined with their heavy dose of talent and skill, and desire to be sexy in sound and persona, puts them in control of their set like it’s a ball of putty. They pull you into a punch-drunk state of awe with dizzy, whirling melodies and effortless vocals that slip and slide through golden high pitched moments, and low, more brooding vocals. Frontwoman Theresa Wayman asks the Danes to party and clap, then tells her audience and band members that it was “the sexiest clap” she’d ever seen. They then move into the shiveringly good harmonies of ‘Undertow’, shredding on a single note, with the stage lights behind flashing up with a matching velocity. ‘Intro’ from their eponymous, sophomore album is played mid-way through the set rather than at the start, making the music feel continuous rather than disjointed. Wayman then starts making cat claws during the chorus of ‘Love is to Die’, then immediately laughs them off; she’s relaxed, comfortable, effortless, and hypnotisingly beautiful to watch and listen to.

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

(Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

HT

 

Haim

Haim are like the big sisters every ten year old girl dreams about, who want to teach you how to play the guitar and the drums and tell you to not care what other people think. Their live drummer plays a low, rumbling line in anticipation before Danielle, Alana and Este run and jump onto the stage like a group of excited puppies (probably a long haired breed. They shake their hair A LOT). After opening with ‘Falling’, the girls move into ‘If I could Change Your Mind’, shredding to the end. They then take a pause to ask permission to jam like they’re at home, as “Roskilde is our home now.” The crowd goes nuts. Este pulls the most fantastic bass faces throughout the set. For reference, see the Jenna Marbles video ‘How To Avoid Talking To People You Don’t Want To Talk To’, add some jerking chicken neck, and you get the idea. Alana ‘Baby’ Haim looks confused, potentially stoned, and when she does open her mouth, has a voice so squeeky it’s hard to decipher what she’s saying. But her skills as she rotates from drums, guitar and keyboard mid-way through tracks suggest that she knows exactly what she’s doing. As the set draws to an end with ‘Let Me Go’, each member bounds over to a large tom-tom and smashes it in time for a drumming trio. The stage explodes with silver confetti, the crowd cheers, and the chirpiest girls in California depart.

Haim (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Haim (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Haim (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

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Deftones

The only survivors of 90s “nu-metal”, and for good reason, Deftones have something of a split personality: on record they can be dark, introspective, full of subtleties to balance the heaviness of the guitars; live, subtlety goes flying off the stage. Frontman Chino Moreno bounces up and down as if the stage were a trampoline, simultaneously attempting autoerotic asphyxiation with his microphone cord.  This, combined with jaunty banter and Chino’s Beyoncé t-shirt, proves that Deftones have developed an effective, if rather blunt, formula for playing festivals. Songs like “My Own Summer (Shove It)” are made for places like this, full of exaggerated swagger. It might not be enough to fill the field in front of Orange Stage, but with the likes of Haim and Damon Albarn playing at Arena, it is significant.

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Deftones (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Deftones (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Deftones (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

 

Damon Albarn

There are two Damon Albarns: cheeky Damon and mopey Damon. You see the latter in interviews all the time, looking a bit wistful, a bit troubled, singing songs that largely reflect what Blur said in 1993: modern life is rubbish. I don’t know where that guy was on Friday, but he wasn’t in Denmark. Instead we got Damon the cockney lad, grinning so broadly you could see his gold tooth from half a mile away. Whatever you might think of Damon’s solo record, Everyday Robots, there is very little of that downbeat meditative quality to the set. Arena is jam-packed and Damon & co. are happy to oblige the mood of the crowd with a set that spans Damon’s career almost in its entirety: Blur, Gorillaz, The Good, the Bad and the Queen, even Rocket Juice & the Moon, his collaboration with Flea and Tony Allen.

By the time the band gets to “El Mañana” and “Out of Time”, this is already one of the great Roskilde gigs. Damon drenches photographers with water, discusses the differences between British and Danish princes, tells us of his Danish ancestry, and generally has a good time. But as the encore reveals, he has a few surprises in store. The band launches into “Clint Eastwood” as Damon introduces Kano, the London-based rapper who had a guest spot on Plastic Beach. It’s the moment when the set moves up a notch into proper crowd-pleasing frenzy. As far as I’m concerned, that’s a great closer for the set, but not so. Damon has another set of friends to play with. They’re in a little group called De La Soul, perhaps you’ve heard of them? It’s a moment of genuine surprise and excitement as the newly augmented band launch into “Feel Good Inc.” and from this moment on it is sealed: for today at least, this is the highlight.

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Damon Albarn (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Damon Albarn (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Damon Albarn (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Darkside

No one really sees Darkside. Appropriately to their name, the duo spend their entire set in the shadows, only emerging as silhouettes when the lights behind them flare up. Avalon is packed with people awkwardly swaying along to a ten minute simmering overture. I suppose this is the one set that I was most curious about on this day. Having enjoyed their debut’s brooding, low-key menace, full of muted vocals and Chris Rea-style (ask your parents about him, they’ll know) slide guitar, it wasn’t immediately apparent how Nicolas Jaar and Dave Harrington were going to translate this into a festival setting. The answer is by emphasising a very basic, heavy, four-on-the-floor drum beat. The crowd was certainly jumping, but the effect was to turn these wrought soundscapes into dance tracks that bordered at times on the formulaic.

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Darkside (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Darkside (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Future Islands

Respect to those lucky people who managed to get into the Avalon tent to see Future Islands. Those of us who calmly strolled in fifteen minutes before the beginning were confronted with an ocean of people in the field outside of the tent, trying to peer in. Everyone wants to catch a glimpse of Samuel T. Herring’s already semi-legendary dance moves. If Future Islands are overwhelmed by all this, it certainly doesn’t hinder their playing. Herring invites people to crowd-surf, although we cannot confirm that anyone took him up on the offer. Instead he likes telling us what the songs are about, which would be a mark of awful pretension if it weren’t done with such openness. The great quality of the band is to sound unaffected and completely theatrical at the same time. Songs like “A Dream of You and Me”, “A Song for Our Grandfathers”, “Doves”, are instant synth-pop classics, full of bounce, poise and precision. But if we are going to be honest with each other, it is obvious that most people are at the gig for one song, and one song only. “Seasons (Waiting On You)” is not a fast song, but it comes on like a rush. Herring growls and wails does his dad-dance and mimes the song in sweeping gestures. Though at the back, you had to imagine this more than you could watch it.

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Future Islands (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Darkside (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Future Islands (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Future Islands (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Future Islands (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

CC = Charlie Cassarino
HT = Helen Thomas

Roskilde Festival 2014: Thursday 3rd July

in Live Reviews by

Photo by Morten Aaagard Krogh

Earl Sweatshirt

Thebe Neruda Kgositsile has rammed out the newly installed Avalon stage. Those who didn’t run from the gate to the pit queue for Outkast have come straight here to see the Odd Future member in action as their first show of the festival proper. Earl Sweatshirt takes the Avalon’s virginity by jumping straight into his set, and launching the audience into a joint smoking, grinding, nodding frenzy. Before too long he has, predictably, told Denmark how glad he is to be there, and what a difficult time they’ve had at security. It’s a tough life. He then gets the audience of 12,000 to shout, as loud as possible, “I’ll fuck the fucking freckles off your face, bitch,” in preparation for his performance of ‘Molasses’, a track that’s about as charming as the portaloos in Camp L. Then another call and response activity, this time of “I say sweat you say” “SHURT”, which didn’t really get the party going but maintained the awkwardness which kept raising its head between songs. If the Earl had cut some of the chat and kept the beats going instead, his set might have been less weird.

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Earl Sweatshirt (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Electric Wizard

The big dustbowl that is the Arena tent is filling up with an uncharacteristically sombrely dressed crowd as the screens project grainy, Super8 films of the bald Hollywood Satanist Anton LaVey and a profusion of naked women (on the screen, that is; the audience was not quite so uninhibited). Electric Wizard are one of the few bands to really deliver on their name: their look is modelled after the denim’n’beer-faction of the metal 80s, while their music achieves the seemingly impossible – out-Black-Sabbathing Black Sabbath. Their heaviness comes from an almost perverse slowness in the tempo, the sluggish, menacing plodding of Romero zombies. It is this exploration of the boundaries of the genre that makes this band much more than a metal band, or even a doom metal one. Their drones are, in their own way, liturgical, sacred music for the unbelievers. Standing before this unhallowed quartet, this fanged four, will transport you either to the bliss of sensory overload, or the worst hangover of your life. From what I could make out of the yells between songs, they seem pretty keen on getting high as well. And they seemed such nice boys and girls.

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Electric Wizard (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagaard Krogh

Outkast

The Orange Stage is legendary for it’s design, colour, the duck and the people who’ve performed there. Outkast are legendary for telling us what’s cooler than being cool, appreciating good dance moves, discussing the aroma of shit, and apologising to Ms Jackson. And, as their concert yesterday demonstrated, not much else. It was all about the deep cuts and minor hits for the good majority of the performance. For better or worse, especially on anniversary tours, people come to the Orange Stage to hear the hits, but it was at least thirty minutes before the non-hardcore fans heard anything remotely recognisable, in the form of ‘Ms Jackson’. By this time, much to my chagrin, I had wandered to the loos for a wee. To my dismay, I came out of the toilets and got told they’d just played ‘The Way You Move’. Just my fucking luck. Until this point, atmosphere had been pretty flat. A few hopefuls nodded heads and tapped feet, but it wasn’t enough to shift the fact they’d tuned out after 20 minutes. The antithesis of this with ‘Hey Ya’ was unimaginable, but the moment the track wrapped up, the mood fell flat once again. Boring, except for the hits.

HT

Outkast (photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Lykke Li

As the sun began its long descent, Lykke Li brought out her blend of moody, orchestral pop and dark electronic tones to move Roskilde into the nighttime. Lykke’s vocals were drenched in soul, heart and difficulty, but this was matched with an unshaking confidence in her skill, and an infalable ability to ignite those watching with a presence and passion. Soft, melancholic piano and dreamy guitar, clashed with stark and forceful vocals. Effortlessly, Lykke Li used her Roskilde set to confirm her position as the Queen of Scandinavian indie pop.

 HT

The Rolling Stones

It’s the set everyone has been talking about on Thursday, and probably the one they will still be talking about today. I could try to review the Rolling Stones in a measured, rational way, but that is not the way anyone with a heart and a sense of perspective viewed that concert. The big red lips and tongue ooze and pulsate on the screen in a way that is as much unsettling as it is anticipatory. I’m stuck just by the outer barrier, with an ok view of the stage if I head butt the guy next to me. An hour before the set spirits are high, although sporadically dampened by the Gandalf of Roskilde, a grey-faced Swede declaiming “You shall not pass” to any poor kid who tries to get past for a better view. Some Americans next to me are betting on what the opening song will be. One of them wins. “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” erupts on stage as the band does, and everyone knows it’s on. In some ways this is the easiest concert to communicate to someone who wasn’t there. Mick Jagger was Mick Jagger, Ronnie Wood was Ronnie Wood, Keith was Keith, and Charlie Watts was looking haggard as fuck on the drums. Do you really need more? Well, fine.

The Rolling Stones (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

There are many jokes made at the expense of the Stones’ Palaeolithic age, but the mark of true greatness is how they shed all that weight as their set progresses, how Ronnie gets more and more animated, Keith flashes his cheeky grin, and even Charlie Watts cracks a smile. Our Blessed Jagger moves in ways that were previously thought physiologically impossible, and regales the crowd with half a phrasebook’s worth of rather garbled, but highly appreciated, Danish. Who else bothers to do that?  The set spans over two hours, ensuring that, even counting a seemingly endless guitar battle between Keith, Ronnie and Mick Taylor (who joins them for “Midnight Rambler”), there is ample space for the classics. “Gimme Shelter”, “Start Me Up”, “Sympathy for the Devil” and “Brown Sugar” follow one after another, building up the rapture until a short break, followed by a devastating encore. A full choir begins to chant “You Can’t Always Get What You Want”, which stands out from the blues-rock that characterizes most of their set, and has that Dylan-y vibe that makes crowds wave lighters in the air. But it’s back to their primordial, bluesy best with “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”, at which point everything explodes, in several cases literally. Fireworks, larynxes, old-man-boners. The lot.

Addendum: “It’s good to be here. Well, it’s good to be anywhere.” – Keith Richards, Roskilde 2014

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The Rolling Stones (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Master Musicians of Jajouka

“We are the Rolling Stones of Jajouka!” Bandleader Bachir Attar’s quip is not an idle boast. Like their British counterparts, the Master Musicians have more than half a century of experience, are consummate professionals and natural entertainers. It also helps that at least half the band that arrived at Roskilde (after apparent transport difficulties in Lisbon) played on a record produced by the Rolling Stones’ very own Brian Jones. They even have their own Mick Jagger, an ancient, kindly-faced man who struts around the stage, waving his drum above his head. You might not have a guessed that a Moroccan sufi band would go down well at a festival, but the wailing of the rhaitas and the hypnotic rhythm section (their music seems to revolve around sequences of threes and sixes, an utter bitch to clap to but captivating in its unfamiliarity) ensure that the conclusion to the first day of Roskilde concerts ends with a happy audience.

CC

The Master Musicians Of Jajouka with Bachir Attar (Roskilde Festival 2014)

Photo by Morten Aagard Krogh 

CC = Charlie Cassarino
HT = Helen Thomas

Roskilde Rising 2014: Wednesday 2nd July

in Live Reviews/Roskilde Rising by

Karl William

Smooth, soulful vocals and simple drum loop backing were Karl William’s offering to the Rising Stage, a welcome respite from the rock guitar of the past two days. The fresh faced 19 year old seemed rehearsed, but as teenagers often are, slightly awkward. William’s R&B backtracks carried him through ‘Foruden at Forgude’ and ‘Kostumeramt’, with high synths and low bass, he managed to pack a 2,000+ strong crowd in the Rising field, as the crowd mouthed his lyrics from the front to the back.

Karl William (Photo by Tom Spray)

Narcosatanicos 

If there’s one thing you can be sure of in life, it’s that bands who describe themselves as “intense, fucked up psychedelic noise rock collapsing into a distorted, rhythmic mindfuck of saxophones, guitars and LSD,” are utterly terrible. Such is Narcosatanicos’ Facebook description. But with an attitude of open mindedness and positivity, I went to see the acid fans perform. The band powered through their 45 minute set with a light mainly shone on their critically acclaimed self titled album. The crowd certainly wasn’t the largest at the Rising stage but those who were in attendance we’re a dedicated fan base they’ve grown from their early days on the psych scene. 

Narcosatanicos (Photo by Tom Spray)

Narcosatanicos (Photo by Tom Spray)

Narcosatanicos (Photo by Tom Spray) 

Hexis

The extent to my experience with metal music is limited to watching half of the Metallica set at last year’s Roskilde. Consequently, I feel a bit of a fraud reviewing Hexis. But judging by the full crowd of Roskilde Rising’s only black metal band, I would say that a lot of people are quite keen on them. I was stood a fair distance from the crowd in order to prevent all my bones from being crushed in the 30m circle mosh pit of death, but from my totally naïve perspective, I observed: 1) Hexis were totally sick, 2) The moshing was nuts, 3) I could totally get into this and 4) people actually head slam?

Hexis (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Hexis (Photo by James Hjertholm)

The Awesome Welles

Lights, relentless energy, and an incredible amount of power made The Awesome Welles’ performance forceful to the very end. Frontman Adam Nyborg Allen’s unshaking, loud vibrato vocals, and the smashing of the band’s classic rock drum lines made tracks like ‘Out of the Woods’, with a chorus line that falls flat on record, suddenly have the anthemic strength they were always intended to have. As the final act to perform at Roskilde Rising 2014, The Awesome Welles made sure the warm up went out with a bang.

The Awesome Welles (Photo by James Hjertholm)

The Awesome Welles (Photo by James Hjertholm)

Photo by Tom Spray

Roskilde Rising 2014: Tuesday 1st July

in Live Reviews/Roskilde Rising by

Communions

Denmark is no stranger to cool Doc Marten wearing punk artists with bowl haircuts instead of mohicans. Whilst Communions have a bit more melody than their studio neighbours Iceage and Lower, the harsh and wailing vocals, (and the upturned skinny jean look) are just the same. The audience, littered among empty nacho pots, are, if a little grubbier, matching the band. However, as the clouds clear and the sun beats down in full throttle, most heads seem to have sunk heavily into their owner’s hands, rather than being used to smash bodies against one another. A few punk loyalists down the front are moshing happily, but the crowd is otherwise relaxed, drinking beers rather than throwing them. From where I’m standing at least, it doesn’t feel much like a post-punk concert. And Communions don’t seem to think so either. The tracks are well executed and confident and the skill of the band members is evident, but their energy is not travelling further than the first row. The atmosphere is markedly flat. I know it’s probably their custom to look moody, but a little more charisma (and a later slot) wouldn’t have gone a miss.

Communions (Photo by Tom Spray)

Communions (Photo by Tom Spray)

My Heart the Brave

Three hours later, the fiesta seems to have finally reached the Rising Stage. Producer Caspar Hesselager, the man behind My Heart The Brave, is joined by Aske Bode, Jacob Haubjerg and Ask Bock to allow him total freedom of movement when singing into the mic. He seems slightly awkward in this environment, away from the piano or synth, but his blatant energy and excitement is enough to bring the music to life and generate a genuine party feeling out of his electronic backing. His tracks are impossibly catchy, and even those just stopping by find themselves mouthing words they don’t know and, at the very least, nodding their heads and tapping their feet. 45 minutes of pure, unadulterated, summer fun.

My Heart The Brave (Photo by Tom Spray)

My Heart The Brave (Photo by Tom Spray)

My Heart The Brave (Photo by Tom Spray)

Förtress

I hate dick rock, prickish behaviour and bad tattoos. Förtress have all of these, and then some, but there’s no denying they put on a fucking good show. “People were moshing to our soundcheck!” says one band member earlier in the day when we meet for an interview. And when you see Förtress in front of their crowd, this comes as no surprise. They seem to have the most solid fan base of all the Rising acts, cheering and chanting before they’ve even entered the stage. The drummer, known as ‘Vildsvinet’ for his somewhat round body shape, walks onstage wearing nothing but a pair of stars and stripes speedos and shoes. Guitarist Simon plays a guitar riff from behind the curtain before filing himself and the other band members in and revving the crowd into a frenzy. The riff gets repeated as the band disappear and return for the encore. These lads are revelling in the experience, like a group of School of Rock graduates. They even copy Get Your Gun’s performance by bringing on a women’s choir for the denouement of the set. They may only be on the Rising Stage, but Förtress perform like they’re facing a crowd of 100,000 on a comeback tour.

Förtress (Photo by Tom Spray)

Förtress (Photo by Tom Spray)

Förtress (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

Roskilde Rising 2014: Monday 30th June

in Live Reviews/Roskilde Rising by
Get Your Gun (Photo by Tom Spray)

Heimatt

Being the first musician to perform at Roskilde Festival 2014 is not the easiest job in the world. The Roskilde buffs who wait for hours for the gates to open before flooding in and throwing up in a scummy tent that’s already been pissed on are a little too busy to take notice. The remaining crowd can be divided into three categories: the slightly hungover, the very hungover, and the super keen. And for those looking to take off the headache with a little music, Heimatt’s brand of light indie folk is perfect. Yesterday’s performance by frontman Magnus Grilstad’s had soaring vocals that were clear cut and reverberating, with lyrics about Scandinavia, love and sin, blending smoothly with Amalie Kjældgaard Kristensen’s violin.

Heimatt (Photo by Tom Spray)

Get Your Gun

Get Your Gun is a bit like a dark, apocalyptic version of The National, which serves for a nice bit of antithesis when the sun is beating down at what feels like 30 degrees and everyone is gradually declining into a pile of sunburnt skin. However, this didn’t stop singer Andreas arriving in practically head to toe black attire and trench coat. It’s clear that Get Your Gun are a band with a clear idea of their sound and image, but they’re unafraid of making purposeful experimental choices. The band played two tracks with the ‘Shameful Choir’, a men’s choir, a decision they made only a few days prior. Get Your Gun had clarity and clout as they made their debut at Roskilde Festival.

Get Your Gun (Photo by Tom Spray)

Blaue Blume

Blaue Blume’s falsetto vocals and stripped vintage pop sound were in full force as the four piece took to the Rising Stage yesterday evening. After attention from DIY and NME earlier in June, the band seemed wholly at ease with the Roskilde performance. Melodious riff lines and low, steady or spangled guitar underlay the gig to allow light, whispering vocals to grow, harmonise and waver. Effortlessly, the audience got swept away in Blaue Blume’s sound, and prepared for the party night ahead.

Blaue Blume (Photo by Tom Spray)

Photo by Tom Spray

SESSION: Get Your Gun (Roskilde Rising)

in Roskilde Rising/Sessions by

Get Your Gun hail from the northernmost part of Denmark – Aalborg. The trio formed in 2008 by brothers Simon (drums) and Andreas Westmark (vocals/guitar) along with bassist Søren Nørgaard. The band’s sound is built around a combination of raw bursts of energy and monotonous drones. This is supported by a song universe containing noise, desperation and evil from the outmost corners. Their debut album The Worrying Kind was released this spring and has received critical acclaim across Europe. The band are no strangers to Here Today having recorded a session with us previously after the release of their first EP in the fall of 2012, they return to us after being championed by Scandinavia’s largest music festival, Roskilde Festival, as part of their Rising project which will no doubt propel them to even greater heights!

Roskilde Rising 2014 | Bands to catch

in Blog/Roskilde Rising by

Monday 30th June

Who: Heimatt
When: 14:00

Fronted by Magnus Grilstad, Heimatt approaches indie rock through vibe of traditional English folk with its predominantly acoustic arrangements and a violin that offers not only colorful harmonies but sometimes erie textures as well. Grilstad’s throaty vocals have a deep, sensitive resonance and occasionally shade into an American country twang. Their debut EP, To The Mountain, released in February, is energetic in spite of fact that the lyrics betray a pretty constant sadness. With a majority of their tunes being upbeat, however, there is a perfect foil to all of that melancholia, or at least there’s a sense of catharsis.

Who: Get Your Gun
When: 15:30

Get Your Gun hail from the northernmost part of the Danish underground scene – Aalborg. The trio formed in 2008 by brothers Simon (drums) and Andreas Westmark (vocals/guitar) along with bassist Søren Nørgaard. The band’s sound is built around a combination of raw bursts of energy and monotonous drones. This is supported by a song universe containing noise, desperation and evil from the outmost corners. Their debut album The Worrying Kind was released this spring and has received critical acclaim across Europe.

Who: Blaue Blume
When: 17:00

Dramatic in the most theatrical sense of the word, Blaue Blume sound like they’re transmitting from another dimension. Their debut single, “Lost Sons of Boys,” out now, has hints of psychedelia to it, but many of the other tracks they’ve made available follow the darker strain running under that syncopated rhythm. Dominated by a freakishly high yet unexpectedly soulful falsetto — think Cat Stevens without anything to ground him — that offers a severe contrast to the otherwise muted, lethargic arrangements, it’s downtempo, but don’t expect to be able to chill out to these songs. In fact, it might be best to prepare for a little paranoia.

Tuesday 1st July

Who: Communions
When: 15:30

Like their big brothers, Iceage and LowerCommunions are squarely based among the Mayhem set, where waistbands are high, haircuts sharp, and screamed vocals drenched in reverb. The young quartet has gained attention by melding the typical hardcore/goth hybrid of the likes of Iceage with surf-rock melodies and one-note guitar riffs. Their first EP, Cobblestones, was naturally released by Posh Isolation back in January. The band came to the Black Tornado studios in Copenhagen to perform two songs, new track ‘Summer’s Oath’ and title track from their EP ‘Cobblestones’.

Who: My Heart The Brave
When: 18:30

Producer Caspar Hesselager’s brand of electro-pop relies on tightly syncopated rhythms and organic instrumentation. A classical pianist by training, Hesselager layers his songs with quirky riffs that encourage the listener to keep rewinding, in an attempt to prize the layers apart. The “Keep Me From It” single might seem to aspire to summer-hit status, but it’s off-kilter rhythms and steel-drum-imitating piano complicate the song and invite closer listening – which reveals a frantic bassline hidden under the heavy synth stabs. All these elements are brought together by Hesselager’s accented, low-key vocals.

Who: Förtress
When: 21:30

For those that are more hard rock inclined, look no further than the naked, tattooed torsos of Förtress. Recent single ‘Forest of the Wicked’ has all the long hair thrashing a heavy rock fan could wish for, whilst maintaining a solid melody and listenability. They keep their description on the band’s Facebook page simple: “Heavy Rock. Big Dicks. Balls of Steel.” Will their set match the male bravado?

Wednesday 2nd July

Who: Karl William
When: 14:00

Hoods, ginger locks, and the moody glance of a teenager music making teenager not to be messed with. King Krule? Try Karl William. This red head offers up rap and R&B over the simple beats on single ‘Kostumerant’, and tastefully turns his head to synth and autotune on ‘Foruden at Forgude’. Having released his four track EP 1. Sal last September, this Danish rapper looks ready to take the Roskilde rap fans by force.

Who: Narcosatanicos
When: 15:30

Narcosatanicos is a heavy name for a heavy band. The Aarhus-based sextet – including three guitarists and a saxophonist – draw from the likes of Suicide and Hawkwind to create a distinctive form of freeform, psychedelic noise-rock. The No-Wave saxophone wails, coupled with meaty basslines, make this a band that commands attention, manhandling the listener as their sonic hallucinations progress. Though one could spend several happy hours charting Narcosatanicos’ various influences, their sound is all their own, and their live performances promise to be intense and memorable experiences.

Who: Hexis
When: 21:30

Trading mostly in sludgy rhythms, rolling percussion, and lots of growling, Hexis have a sense of dynamics that gives their songs real dimension. Amongst the distortion and evil bellowing are countering shouts and unexpected cadences. The Copenhagen-based five-piece black metal outfit released their latest full length album, Abalam, in January. While their songs do have a thick, unsettling, buzzy quality to them, don’t expect endless, formless droning. They speed through most of their songs in quick, vicious succession, and Abalam clocks in at a succinct thirty five minutes — just enough time to rev you up or give you serious indigestion.

Who: The Awesome Welles
When: 23:00

Copenhagen’s newest ambassadors of brooding and theatrical indie rock may have a pun for a name, but their music is inspired by the straight-faced sincerity of bands like the National. Songs like “120” hark back to the grungy power-pop of the 90s and early 00s, whereas their newest single, “Undertaker”, – reportedly inspired by Soren Kierkegaard – sees them going for a more anthemic approach, with a very clear Scandinavian angle. Having supported the likes of Kellermensch and The Floor is Made of Lava, the Awesome Welles are poised to receive their own share of the limelight.

Roskilde Festival 2014 | Bands to catch

in Blog by

Thursday 3rd July

Who: Earl Sweatshirt
Where: Avalon Stage
When: 17:30

Who: Outkast
Where: Orange Stage
When: 18:30

Who: Chance The Rapper
Where: Avalon Stage
When: 21:00

Who: The Rolling Stones
Where: Orange Stage
When: 22:00

 

Friday 4th July

Who: Connan Mockasin
Where: Pavilion Stage
When: 14:00

Who: Damon Albarn
Where: Arena Stage
When: 20:30

Who: Darkside
Where: Avalon Stage
When: 23:00

Who: Trentemøller
Where: Orange Stage
When: 01:00

Saturday 5th July

Who: Omar Souleyman
Where: Apollo Stage
When: 17:30

Who: Manu Chao
Where: Orange Stage
When: 19:30

Who: Arctic Monkeys
Where: Orange Stage
When: 22:30

Who: Interpol
Where: Arena
When: 00:00

Sunday 6th July

Who: A$AP Ferg
Where: Avalon Stage
When: 16:00

Who: Julia Holter
Where: Gloria Stage
When: 17:00

Who: Stevie Wonder
Where: Orange Stage
When: 20:30

Who: Forest Swords
Where: Gloria Stage
When: 21:00

Roskilde Rising w/ Get Your Gun, Heimatt & The Awesome Welles | Huset, Copenhagen, 19.06.2014

in Photos/Roskilde Rising by

Photos by Tom Spray and Morten Aagaard Krogh

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SESSION: Narcosatanicos (Roskilde Rising)

in Roskilde Rising/Sessions by

Narcosatanicos is a heavy name for a heavy band. The Aarhus-based sextet – including three guitarists and a saxophonist – draw from the likes of Suicide and Hawkwind to create a distinctive form of freeform, psychedelic noise-rock. The No-Wave saxophone wails, coupled with meaty basslines, make this a band that commands attention, manhandling the listener as their sonic hallucinations progress. Though one could spend several happy hours charting Narcosatanicos’ various influences, their sound is all their own, and their live performances promise to be intense and memorable experiences.

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